Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 04-23-2013, 02:52 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 360
How much syrup does a given amount of water and sugar produce?

I thought this would be easy enough to look up, but it's been driving me insane all evening.

If I made a simple syrup using 1 or 2 parts sugar to 1 part water, how would I calculate how much of each I need for Xml of syrup?

All the recipes I've looked up just spoke of X parts of sugar and Y parts of water (and generally didn't list the amount of syrup they produced at the end of it).
#2
Old 04-23-2013, 03:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,915
Well assuming you are doing the parts by volume - a tablespoon of water is 14.79 grams - the weight of a tablespoon of sugar is 12.55 grams - add the together - you get 27.34 if you want to scale this to a for example - a cup (and this all assumes density is close to 1 - which it should be) -

A cup is ~236 cc which is ~236 grams

Figure out the water using ratio of known

14.79/27.34 = x/236
14.79 * 236 / 27.34
127.66 grams of water

Not sure if this is what you are looking for.

Last edited by DataX; 04-23-2013 at 03:13 PM. Reason: Said water instead of sugar in one place
#3
Old 04-23-2013, 03:09 PM
ski ski is offline
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 544
If you took 1 cup of water, and added 2 cups of sugar, wouldn't that give you 3 cups of syrup? What am I missing?
#4
Old 04-23-2013, 03:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 12,056
an experiment will end your torment.

take a measuring cup of water, in a glass measuring cup of larger volume, add the sugar for that volume of water. stir until dissolved. measure the resulting volume.

you can always use that proportional change in the water volume for other amounts.
#5
Old 04-23-2013, 03:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,915
Also - FWIW - you can get more sugar to disolve if you heat the water - see for example...
http://middleschoolchemistry.com...apter5/lesson6
#6
Old 04-23-2013, 03:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,915
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski View Post
If you took 1 cup of water, and added 2 cups of sugar, wouldn't that give you 3 cups of syrup? What am I missing?
Technically the sugar has empty spaces in between - which will disappear when dissolved - it doesn't make that much of a difference, but some might not realize that on first glance.
#7
Old 04-23-2013, 03:18 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 3,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski View Post
If you took 1 cup of water, and added 2 cups of sugar, wouldn't that give you 3 cups of syrup? What am I missing?
When it's combined, the volume doesn't stay constant after the sugar dissolves.

Put some water and vodka in two measuring cups, note the volume, then pour one into the other. The whole is less than the sum of the parts.
#8
Old 04-23-2013, 03:20 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: TX
Posts: 810
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski View Post
If you took 1 cup of water, and added 2 cups of sugar, wouldn't that give you 3 cups of syrup? What am I missing?
I am not a chemist, but it seems you're missing:
a) Assuming the sugar doesn't dissolve (a bad assumption), then one would expect the water to fill in the space between the sugar granules, so you'd have a little more than 2 cups of syrup (or slurry), and
b) the sugar will dissolve, allowing a more compact arrangement of water and sugar, which IIRC (again, IANAC) will result in a solution near the volume to the solvent, or a little more than 1 cup of a syrup that is much more dense than water.
#9
Old 04-23-2013, 03:21 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 3,708
To the OP, you should be able to work it out if you can weigh some prepared syrup of a specified volume and work out the density. Be sure to note the temperature as well. If you heated it to aid dissolution and you intend to use it at room temperature, you should wait until it cools down before taking your measurement.
#10
Old 04-23-2013, 03:22 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Hampshire, England
Posts: 13,359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhodes View Post
I am not a chemist, but it seems you're missing:
a) Assuming the sugar doesn't dissolve (a bad assumption), then one would expect the water to fill in the space between the sugar granules, so you'd have a little more than 2 cups of syrup (or slurry), and
b) the sugar will dissolve, allowing a more compact arrangement of water and sugar, which IIRC (again, IANAC) will result in a solution near the volume to the solvent, or a little more than 1 cup of a syrup that is much more dense than water.
Yes, intuitively I would expect 2 cups of water plus 1 cup of sugar to yield only a little more than 1 cup of syrup. It's easy enough to find out empirically; unfortunately I'm not near a kitchen to try it right now. Come on, somebody, fight ignorance!

Last edited by Colophon; 04-23-2013 at 03:22 PM. Reason: I accidentally the spelling
#11
Old 04-23-2013, 04:06 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: NY/NJ, USA
Posts: 5,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by DataX View Post
Well assuming you are doing the parts by volume - a tablespoon of water is 14.79 grams - the weight of a tablespoon of sugar is 12.55 grams - add the together - you get 27.34
What the OP wants to know is: what is the volume of that 27.34 grams of syrup?

There's gotta be a handbook that lists this sort of stuff, no?
#12
Old 04-23-2013, 04:31 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: New London, CT
Posts: 3,758
I think the calculator at the bottom of this page does what the OP is looking for, albeit indirectly. The degrees brix of a solution is the percentage by weight that is composed of sugar, and the calculator gives you the density. So, for example:
  • 100 mL table sugar is about 159 g; 100 mL of water is 100 g.
  • A solution made of the two would therefore be 159/259 = 61.4Bx.
  • According to the calculator, a 61.4Bx solution has a density of 1330 kg/m3, or 1.33 g/mL.
  • The solution weighs 259 g, so its volume is therefore 259/1.33 = 195 mL.
Similarly, a syrup composed of 200 mL of sugar and 100 mL of water would be 75.5Bx, have a density of 1.52 g/mL, and have a volume of about 268 mL.

Last edited by MikeS; 04-23-2013 at 04:32 PM. Reason: forgot the damn link
#13
Old 04-23-2013, 04:34 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 360
That sounds perfect (it's been a long time since A level chemistry...).

I was hoping it would be something simple along the lines of water being able to dissolve up to X g/ml of sugar and anything after that adding to the volume....
#14
Old 04-23-2013, 04:43 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: New London, CT
Posts: 3,758
Of course, in my calculations I used the density of a solid sugar block, not the average density of granulated sugar. (Granulated sugar, of course, contains a lot of air when it's sitting in your measuring cup.) The density of granulated sugar is closer to 90 g/100 mL, so running through the numbers again:
  • 100 mL sugar + 100 mL water is 47.3Bx, which is 1.23 g/mL, which is 154 mL.
  • 200 mL sugar + 100 mL water is 64.2Bx, which is 1.38 g/mL, which is 202 mL.
#15
Old 04-23-2013, 04:46 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 37,904
For any amount of sugar and water you will have either more syrup than you need, or less.
#16
Old 04-23-2013, 04:47 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 360
"Twice the volume of the water" should work as a rule of thumb (I can ere on the side of caution and make slightly too much). Thanks for the help!
#17
Old 04-23-2013, 05:04 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 8,867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bisected8 View Post
"Twice the volume of the water" should work as a rule of thumb (I can ere on the side of caution and make slightly too much). Thanks for the help!
The numbers from MikeS would suggest that it's syrup = water + sugar/2 for a simple rule of thumb.
#18
Old 04-23-2013, 05:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Hampshire, England
Posts: 13,359
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeS View Post
Of course, in my calculations I used the density of a solid sugar block, not the average density of granulated sugar. (Granulated sugar, of course, contains a lot of air when it's sitting in your measuring cup.) The density of granulated sugar is closer to 90 g/100 mL, so running through the numbers again:
  • 100 mL sugar + 100 mL water is 47.3Bx, which is 1.23 g/mL, which is 154 mL.
  • 200 mL sugar + 100 mL water is 64.2Bx, which is 1.38 g/mL, which is 202 mL.
So that seems to imply that if you add granulated sugar to water in anything much more than a 2:1 ratio, the volume of the syrup will be less than the volume of the sugar. (Assuming enough water to dissolve it.)

Last edited by Colophon; 04-23-2013 at 05:05 PM.
#19
Old 04-23-2013, 08:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Hampshire, England
Posts: 13,359
Quote:
Originally Posted by dracoi View Post
The numbers from MikeS would suggest that it's syrup = water + sugar/2 for a simple rule of thumb.
I just tested this out. FOR SCIENCE!!!!

50ml of sugar (I only had caster sugar, which is presumably rather denser than granulated, as the grains are smaller).

50ml of water.

Add sugar to water and get approx 80ml before mixing.

The sugar didn't want to dissolve very easily so I warmed the mixture in the microwave, and the volume didn't appear to change once it dissolved - there's still about 80ml of syrup.

So, taking into account that 50ml of caster sugar will have a bit more actual sugar in it than 50ml of granulated (less air in the gaps), I think the "water + sugar/2" ratio is a pretty good approximation.
#20
Old 04-24-2013, 12:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 360
Hmm, in that case, I've just worked out that for a recipe (I'm making a liqueur and wanted to make sure it was roughly 20% alcohol by volume) I need 612.5 ml of syrup (since I'm using 700ml of 37.5% dark rum as the base).

So that would be [612.5/2 = 306.25ml] of water, plus [612.5ml = 582.5g] caster sugar?
#21
Old 04-24-2013, 02:39 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 28,269
Just use a liter of water, and 2 kg of sugar. Make your simple syrup, use 612.5ml for your liqueur, and save the rest for making mojitos, or daiquiris, or something.

I guess what I'm trying to say is: why do you feel the need for such precision?
#22
Old 04-24-2013, 02:48 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Posts: 10,690
I made simple syrup yesterday, and I can confirm that 1c water + 2c sugar made just about 2c of syrup.
#23
Old 04-24-2013, 02:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 360
Well, I tend to find if I make things in bulk for something specific, I tend not to end up using them anyway.

Plus it would take ages for that much syrup to cool and spread the process of preparing the liqueur over an entire day (not to mention get me moaned at for leaving a large pan full of syrup out).
#24
Old 04-24-2013, 04:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Hampshire, England
Posts: 13,359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Yes, intuitively I would expect 2 cups of water plus 1 cup of sugar to yield only a little more than 1 cup of syrup.
I meant "a little more than 2 cups of syrup" there, of course. You're not going to get less syrup than water!
#25
Old 04-24-2013, 04:23 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 28,269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bisected8 View Post
Well, I tend to find if I make things in bulk for something specific, I tend not to end up using them anyway.

Plus it would take ages for that much syrup to cool and spread the process of preparing the liqueur over an entire day (not to mention get me moaned at for leaving a large pan full of syrup out).
Still not quite understanding. Are you working in a restaurant, and the chef wants you to make some house-made liqueur?
#26
Old 04-25-2013, 02:02 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
Still not quite understanding. Are you working in a restaurant, and the chef wants you to make some house-made liqueur?
No, I'm making liqueur at home, since making my own's cheaper than buying it (plus commercial hazelnut liqueurs don't have much flavour, apparently). Excess syrup means wastage (since I know I won't use it), thus defeating the object of the exercise.

Last edited by Bisected8; 04-25-2013 at 02:02 PM.
#27
Old 04-25-2013, 08:27 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 28,269
Well, your ability to perform calculations from known values seems up to snuff. Use a half liter of water and a kilo of sugar, then measure how much syrup it makes, and adjust the remaining ingredients to match that volume.
#28
Old 04-27-2013, 08:07 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 7,826
Wouldn't it depend on how long the sugar/water mixture is heated? The process of turning 'sugar water' into 'syrup' involved heating, which evaporates (or boils off) some of the water. It seems that the more heat that is applied, the more water will be driven off, and the less syrup will be left at the end.
#29
Old 04-27-2013, 09:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Torrance Ca
Posts: 7,315
Couldn't you just weigh out a 16 0z container of syrup and anything over 16 oz would be sugar.
#30
Old 08-09-2014, 12:23 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 2
sugar syrup

i've been having this same problem. i make up a cranberry liqueur w/ 40lbs of cranberries at a time, using a recipe i got from my dad for 1 lb. of cranberries. the original recipe calls for 1-1/2 c. of a heavy syrup made w/ 2c. sugar to 1c. water. i finally decided to figure out how many lbs. of sugar i needed, so i boiled 2 c. sugar (actually a 1/2 & 1/2 mix of splenda & raw sugar) in 1 c. water & voila! it equals 1-1/2 c. syrup; thus ea. cup of sugar = 3/4 c. of a syrup using a 2:1 sugar to water ratio. since there are 2-1/4 c. sugar per lb, it's fairly simple to figure out how many lbs that equals & thus how many 5lb bags to buy...YAY! (for my 40lb batch of liqueur, i need 60 c. of heavy syrup, thus 80 c. of sugar/2.25=35.5lb). since i used a mix of splenda & raw sugar, i will double-check w/ the reg sugar...if there's any difference, i''l post the results.
#31
Old 08-09-2014, 12:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 2
btw, the amount was the same before & after heating. i did it in my microwave, so there was probably little to no evaporation, but if u cover the pot when you boil the syrup, then the distillate should return to the syrup.
#32
Old 08-10-2014, 10:56 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 4,194
Simple rule of thumb - the sugar crystals are half the density of solid sugar, due to all the air inside.

They will take up half the volume, when in solution (no more air.)

If you add a cup of sugar crystals to the syrup, the syrup volume will increase by 1/2 cup.
#33
Old 08-11-2014, 12:38 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Greater Victoria, BC
Posts: 4,675
That reminds me, hummingbird feeders are due for the weekly clean-and-refill.

I make simple syrup a lot!
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:59 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: extradition countries coo coo kachoo bukaki porn suicide drowning gillette rapper prime star dish scp 1348 checkers mandatory jump doctors lawyers engineers bad bed head tie company names wendy's packaging llbean flannel tolling service oliver's army meaning mainboard temperature chloroform kidnappings black hair name molly holly thong porch rail height jogging stroller wheels invisible fence cats adhesive for foam modem baud rates johnny cash sucks kamel cigarettes rectangle 3d vorlon costume general tsao pronunciation girl junior suicide by tylenol phone receiver commentate vs comment gross hot dog alkaline battery vs non alkaline transport freezer on side animals that fight to the death what is rating ur it's hotter than jokes ground beef turns brown in fridge. is it bad wells fargo cd interest rate safety meeting topics funny sauces for chicken ravioli torsion bar garage door opener perks at work wowpoints the prisoner episode order good brake rotors brands is home depot open new year's day car lot name ideas using tivo without service one click car wont start what does 7 alarm fire mean radio wont turn off with ignition how to say black person in spanish removing wires from light switch banning a customer from your store firehouse subs sandwich sizes what does shoes hanging on power lines mean hershey chocolate bar size carl on good times amazon how to buy add on items reason for blood test before marriage why do frats have paddles no soliciting sign law holly type bush with blue berries pasta roni without milk most dangerous forms of transportation how to serve guava