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Old 08-21-2013, 08:43 PM
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Does your kitchen/house heat up when using the oven

It seems like in many threads someone (or several) will comment on how they won't use the oven in the summer because it heats up the kitchen/house too much. I'm just curious... I just baked dinner for about 1.5 hours at 400 degrees and there isn't one degree of difference I can feel between my kitchen and the rest of the house.

I also have a 5 burner gas cook top that puts out something like 70 bajillion BTU's and even if I put all five on inferno you will only notice a difference withing a foot or two of the surface, and even then it isn't bad unless you maybe lean your face directly over the flames. I could certainly cook in the rest of the kitchen without any discomfort.

So, is it because people don't have/run the AC, the oven is old and un-insulated, the kitchen is small with no air flow between the rest of the house, or what?

I've never lived in a house where this was a problem, but I seem to read this here a lot.
Old 08-21-2013, 09:33 PM
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I don't have air conditioning and yes, the kitchen and dining area heats up when using the oven. That's good in winter, but it can be unbearable when it's very hot.
Old 08-21-2013, 09:39 PM
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I have air conditioning, the house is only twelve years old, and the living areas are basically one big room. And yes, if I use the oven a lot, it will heat up the area.
Old 08-21-2013, 09:42 PM
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Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
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I have central AC, and yes, the oven makes it work a little harder in summer, but it helps the furnace in winter. The thermostat is in the dining room, with a small "breakfast room" between it and the kitchen. The oven also helps out a little when the power is off in winter (along with the living room fireplace).
Old 08-21-2013, 09:44 PM
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We only have AC in the master bedroom. We use the heat issue as an excuse to cook dinner on the grill outside. Win/Win.
Old 08-21-2013, 09:45 PM
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I have a couple of window unit A/Cs, but not one in the kitchen. And yes, it gets hotter than several hells in there. We use the Crock-Pot a lot in the summer, or eat cool meals like chicken salad.
Old 08-21-2013, 09:48 PM
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The kitchen's at the other end of the house from the window AC units, so it's always warmer in there regardless. I wouldn't want to make a midsummer Thanksgiving dinner or anything, but it's fine just to cook dinner in and then go back to the rest of the house.
Old 08-21-2013, 10:12 PM
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I have a digital indoor thermometer in the kitchen. It sits on a counter about four feet from the electric range. I've noticed no temperature change when I use the burners or the oven, but if I open the oven door and leave it open for a couple minutes -- like when I'm basting a turkey, the temp will rise.

I use the gas range in the basement for canning -- all four burners. It warms up half the basement, and will set off the fire/smoke/heat alarm at the top of the basement stairs.
Old 08-21-2013, 10:16 PM
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I have central, there is one vent that goes into the kitchen, and, yes, it's significantly hotter in there when I'm cooking. Doesn't stop me, but it's probably 5-10 degrees warmer in the kitchen.
Old 08-21-2013, 10:22 PM
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The building I live in is nearly 100 years old. There isn't any outside ventilation in either the kitchen or bathroom, in the form of hood vents or things like that. Just windows, ceiling fans, window fans, and window a/c. It's generally 70-75 in my apartment year-round, in the summer with the a/c units on or windows open, or in winter with the steam radiators.

Running the oven in these conditions always heats the apartment up. I won't run it in summer, just the stovetop with which I will braise if I decide I really want to cook a roast. Otherwise, short cooking sessions is it, and no oven in summer. In winter, if I run the oven for something like a roast for a couple hours or slow roast even at low temp for 6 hours, it can reach up to 82F or so in my apartment. Sometimes I have to open the windows in winter when I'm cooking/baking an involved meal.

Last edited by SeaDragonTattoo; 08-21-2013 at 10:22 PM.
Old 08-21-2013, 10:24 PM
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Yes, our kitchen area warms up when the oven is used.

We have a "smart" thermostat, and in the winter it expects the additional heat, so if dinner doesn't use the oven one day, the house is cold around dinner time, when it's expecting the additional heating.
Old 08-21-2013, 11:34 PM
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How could it not heat up the kitchen? All that heat has to go somewhere, after all.
Old 08-22-2013, 12:12 AM
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My oven is insulated... when the inside heats up, it stays hot. It isn't pouring out heat the entire time it is baking. I can stand just outside of my oven and not feel any excess heat. I did grill something tonight (yes I baked earlier, but my son came home and was hungry for a Johnsonville "better with cheddar") and I could definitely feel the 700 degree heat coming from the grill.

Lets say we open the hot oven up and let all of the 400 degrees out (which I wouldn't normally do)... we're talking about something around 3' x 3' x 3 = 27' of 400 degree air into a 1,000 square foot main floor area... with about 8 foot ceilings (I guess 100' x 10' x 8' = 8,000'). I'm sure I'll screw up the math but that is a small percentage to counter the rest of the 72 degree air. Since I don't normally just open the oven door and let it all pour out, it slowly dissipates out over the several hours it takes for the oven to cool down.

I have to say I'm shocked that everyone says theirs does and I seem to be the only one who's kitchen doesn't raise 10 degrees whenever you use the oven for any length of time. Maybe I don't pay enough attention to my AC bill or care enough for the couple of extra dollars spent to enjoy something baked in the oven.
Old 08-22-2013, 12:15 AM
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My house is ~30 years old. Central A/C, in South Florida. I've never noticed a temperature difference from having either my oven or my stove top on. I have a fairly open floor plan - maybe the air just circulates enough? Next time I'm baking something, I'll break out the infra red thermometer and see if I can detect any differences.
Old 08-22-2013, 12:19 PM
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My house is 57 years old with no central air and only one wall air conditioner. Also, the kitchen is on the west side of the house so it gets the full brunt of the late afternoon sun (no trees to block it) and it will warm up considerably when I run the oven in addition to the sun beating down.
Old 08-22-2013, 12:27 PM
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The kitchen heats up, but I can stand it.
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Old 08-22-2013, 12:27 PM
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It sounds like you have a high end range with a very well insulated oven. Not everyone does. Mine is actually more than 10 years old and the insulation doesn't work as well as it did (and it was low end to begin with.) Most of the heat from my oven doesn't come from opening the door, it comes from the continued use of it over a long period of time. The oven doesn't come to 400 degrees and then stop heating. There is continued heat loss into the room that the oven must fix by reheating often. The room gets hot because there is heat being added to it over at least an hour of use (I can't seem to use my oven for less than an hour at a time.)

I also don't have central air and live in an area that has had over 100 degree temps most of the summer.

This doesn't mean that cookies aren't worth it, but we do pay a price when we use the oven.
Old 08-22-2013, 12:28 PM
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Our house definitely heats up when the oven is on. Living where we do, it's seldom a problem, and often a nice side effect.
Old 08-22-2013, 02:05 PM
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Mine heats up enough that I try to not use the oven much in the summer. (It's easier now that the Weeping Princess set a bag of tortilla chips on fire in it last week; the ensuing chaos resulted in a broken element). I have a fairly new AC unit as well as a window AC in the living room, but there is a vaulted ceiling bridging the living room and kitchen and the heat seems to build there.
In the summer I use the stove top (even that produces some heat), crock pot, rotisserie, etc. In winter I try to use the oven every day to help heat the house.
Old 08-22-2013, 02:14 PM
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Yes, all other things remaining constant, using my oven will definitely make my kitchen measurably warmer. Maybe by a degree if I have something in for more than half an hour at 400F.

Partly because of this, the window air conditioner is in the kitchen, so usually it's still the coolest room in the apartment during the summer.
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Old 08-22-2013, 03:13 PM
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I'm not entirely sure my oven has any insulation. I mean, I suppose it must, or the outside would cause blisters when you touch it, but the inside dimensions seem awfully close to the outside dimensions. It's one of those "what's the cheapest oven that will let me rent out this apartment as having appliances" models. And, of course, as a renter, I ain't about to replace it with something better.
Old 08-22-2013, 03:24 PM
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With central air, it's not so much that my house gets warmer as that my electricity bill goes through the roof. ($300+. Sometimes +++.) If I had a way to close off the kitchen, I wouldn't mind baking in the summertime, but the public spaces are wide open, so there's no practical way to isolate the heat to just one room.
Old 08-22-2013, 03:34 PM
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I wonder if there's a difference, too, for people whose oven/stove is freestanding in the middle of the wall, not tucked against a wall or in a bank of cabinets. There's nowhere for my heat to go except the air, while my mom's oven can sink a lot of heat into the adjacent wall and the dishwasher next to the oven on the other side.
Old 08-22-2013, 04:03 PM
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I can't use my oven in the summer, and if I cook anything in the summer I usually like to cook something I can cook in the morning and reheat or on when hubby is home, we grill meat outside.

But we live in the deep south and our house is pretty small, 50 plus years old and has no central heating or cooling. We have several smaller window units in living room and for each bedroom.

Now in the winter, I absolutely use the oven as much as possible to help warm up the house since it's off the ground and not closed on bottom, it gets very cold floors . We have one gas heater, and use smaller electric heaters in bedrooms for heat.

There are basically only two seasons here it seems like, it's either hot as hell or cold for a few months.. not much spring like weather or fall weather going on.

I think it's largely to do with the house though, being old and not well insulated, or up to date. My mom's house is central cooling and she uses her oven all summer without house heating up.
Old 08-22-2013, 04:26 PM
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We have a galley kitchen in our 43 year old house, and running the oven for a while will heat it up in there, but it doesn't heat up the rest of the house at all.

Part of the problem is that while we have AC vents in the kitchen (small ones), the return vents aren't really near there, so the hot air just sort of collects in there.
Old 08-22-2013, 04:33 PM
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Yep, galley kitchen that faces west. Even with thermal blinds to help block/absorb heat pouring in our sliding glass door, it's hotter around dinnertime in the kitchen and dining area before we ever start cooking. I just knock the AC down a few degrees and deal with it, but it's not at all unusual to sit down to eat dinner all sweaty.
Old 08-22-2013, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
The kitchen heats up, but I can stand it.
LOL.

To the OP: I'm curious how the law of thermodynamics bypasses your abode. I can see have a well-insulated oven that slows the transfer of heat but I can't wrap my head around the thought that 5 open flames causes nothing outside a 1-2 foot radius of those flames. Could you start a real fire (maybe in the kitchen sink) and see if it does anything to the temp in your kitchen? That should settle the debate!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spud View Post
I also have a 5 burner gas cook top that puts out something like 70 bajillion BTU's and even if I put all five on inferno you will only notice a difference withing a foot or two of the surface, and even then it isn't bad unless you maybe lean your face directly over the flames. I could certainly cook in the rest of the kitchen without any discomfort.
Old 08-22-2013, 06:53 PM
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Even if your oven had perfect insulation (it doesn't, not by a long shot), you're still going to open it eventually, at which point you're releasing a decent volume of 350 degree air into your house.
Old 08-22-2013, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wguy123 View Post
LOL.

To the OP: I'm curious how the law of thermodynamics bypasses your abode. I can see have a well-insulated oven that slows the transfer of heat but I can't wrap my head around the thought that 5 open flames causes nothing outside a 1-2 foot radius of those flames. Could you start a real fire (maybe in the kitchen sink) and see if it does anything to the temp in your kitchen? That should settle the debate!
Yes, I understand the law of thermodynamics... and honestly I don't know that I've ever had all five burners on full blast as the same time. Anyway, I'm not disputing that there is some heat released into the room. Much of it I believe is going up through the vent hood and being exhausted to the outside. It is never something you feel you need to back away from or leave the room though.

With the oven, the release of the heat is so slow it isn't noticeable to me or anyone else who has been in our house. Or maybe it is because I have great air circulation, or the AC is very good... I don't know. What I do know is that we've left the oven on in the summer and only noticed it because of the clicking as it cycles on and off. We have never had to limit our time in the kitchen because it was hotter than anywhere else in the house.

Actually, we notice a change of a few degrees between the upstairs and the main floor (and the basement is always cooler), but none between the kitchen and the adjoining rooms.

I guess I've always lived a privileged life since I've never experienced this problem (I've also had central AC for the last 43 years or so).
Old 08-22-2013, 07:54 PM
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I don't have central air in my apartment(it's the second floor of my house) and given the configuration of the rooms the gas stove does seem to warm up my place.

I still use it, but not for long term roasting or such. The kitchen is open to my living room area, and the window AC is in the bedroom, with a fan to blow the cooler air out to the rest of the apartment. Most of the time that's enough, but the oven working makes it, if not hot, not as cool as I want.
Old 08-22-2013, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lacunae Matata View Post
With central air, it's not so much that my house gets warmer as that my electricity bill goes through the roof. ($300+. Sometimes +++.) If I had a way to close off the kitchen, I wouldn't mind baking in the summertime, but the public spaces are wide open, so there's no practical way to isolate the heat to just one room.
My mother used to prepare a roast in a slow cooker, and put it in the garage to cook when she wanted roasts in the summer. Slow cookers don't give off nearly as much heat as an oven does, but even so, every little bit helps.

Since it usually gets over 100 F here during most of the summer, I don't turn on the oven during most of the year.
Old 08-23-2013, 08:10 AM
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Heck, my son has a small one bedroom apartment. He still managed to fit a large 55-60" TV in his living room. He tells me he has to keep it off during the day because the heat generated from it is just enough to over power his crappy AC. (In other words, it stays on all day and the temp in his apartment never goers below 80°.)


I have no problem with using the oven in my house.
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