Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 09-10-2013, 05:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
Remote and/or exotic towns/settlements/areas in the US

Sort of a half-bucket list half-serious travel question. I'm looking to travel to the most remote and/or exotic locales in the US (including Territories). Got any ideas? What areas should be on my list?

For the purposes of this question, I'm looking for good subjective opinions that can, and should, consider things other than or in addition to absolute raw distance from major cities, population size, distinct population demographics by numbers, etc. and identify places that emphasize social isolation, cultural distinctions, Non-English speaking communities or other concepts that just make the places exotic or interesting. The places don't have to be islands, and don't absolutely have to be inhabited, but there should be some reasonable possibility of traveling there. Other than perhaps Midway Atoll, the US Minor Outlying Islands are mostly out because they are so difficult to get to, not only because of lack of infrastructure but because you need permits to enter that appear to be hard to get.

For example, other than perhaps San Francisco, are there any "gay towns"?

Last edited by robert_columbia; 09-10-2013 at 05:07 PM.
#2
Old 09-10-2013, 05:38 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 28,340
Supai, Arizona. Although it's adjacent to Grand Canyon National Park and it only takes a couple hours to get close to it from Flagstaff, Wikipedia calls it the most isolated community in the continental U.S. You can only get there by helicopter or foot/animal (around 10 miles) once you reach the plateau it's located under. Mail goes out by mule train every week.

Culturally, they aren't isolated more than the average Indian tribe since they make money from tourism, (combined of course with the differences from city life that come from being in an isolated small town.)

I have a feeling this physical isolation is partly on purpose, because on some maps there is a Jeep trail that leads to Supai. So there may have been a road there at one point that could have been improved but at some point they decided to just close it. Then again it may have been from the Grand Canyon park itself and I think there was a legal challenge the Supai Tribe had to go through to get as much land as they currently have back.
#3
Old 09-10-2013, 05:45 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 39,938
Try Kaktovik, Barter Island, Alaska. Remote, Inupiat village, need to fly in on a rather small aircraft. Polar bears roam freely and come in to feed on discarded whale carcasses. There's a place to stay called, laughingly, the Waldo Arms Hotel. It's a series of welded together shipping containers, but is comfortable, and the food isn't bad.
#4
Old 09-10-2013, 05:56 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 1,600
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert_columbia View Post
For example, other than perhaps San Francisco, are there any "gay towns"?
To answer this part specifically, Rehoboth Beach, DE is well known for having a large gay presence. A lot of shops are gay owned and I believe part of the beach is specifically a gay hotspot. Not that the whole town isn't, but you know what I mean.

Now, while I'm at it I might as well mention Punkin Chunkin, the Apple Scrapple festival, and muskrat sandwiches, all part of southern DE culture. Really, anything south of the canal in DE is going to be a whole different world than northern DE. Delaware isn't remote by any stretch of the imagination but I figured I would mention those cultural high points just in case they tickled your fancy.
#5
Old 09-10-2013, 07:00 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Saint Paul
Posts: 26,476
Well, you just missed Burning Man...
#6
Old 09-10-2013, 07:22 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Shadow of the Sierras
Posts: 2,139
Second Burning Man.


You might check out Buford, Wyoming, population 1. It's on I-80 some 25 miles east of Cheyenne.
#7
Old 09-10-2013, 08:11 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Falls Church, Va.
Posts: 13,703
The Gullah community is culturally unique.

California's Lost Coast, and specifically the Victorian town of Ferndale, are a lot more difficult to get to than the map would imply.

Slab City was mentioned in Into the Wild.

There's the Terra Vivos underground luxury development.
#8
Old 09-10-2013, 08:29 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 77,330
There's Point Roberts, Washington which is physically separated from the rest of the United States - you have to drive through Canada to reach it.
#9
Old 09-10-2013, 08:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Durango, CO
Posts: 3,654
Walpi.
#10
Old 09-10-2013, 08:46 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 77,330
Beaver River is an extremely isolated community in the Adirondack region of upstate New York. It's mostly a summer resort but it has a handful of year-round residents. The "town" isn't connected to the power grid - it uses generators for electricity. There's also no roads that reach the town - you have to get to it by boat in the summer or snowmobile in the winter.
#11
Old 09-10-2013, 08:48 PM
Shouting Grasshopper
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Meridian/280
Posts: 13,296
I don't know if you can visit the place, but I'll add Bohemian Grove to the list.
#12
Old 09-10-2013, 08:51 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 10,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert_columbia View Post
For example, other than perhaps San Francisco, are there any "gay towns"?
I've heard that Columbia, Missouri has the highest per capita gay population of any city other than the Bay Area. Is that true? I used to live in that region and visited Columbia many times, and didn't see evidence of it but maybe it's because I wasn't looking.
#13
Old 09-10-2013, 09:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Saint Paul
Posts: 26,476
Mono Hot Springs, in the Sierra Nevada range, is a bit hard to get to. Beautiful area, great hiking, trout fishing, and hot springs.
#14
Old 09-10-2013, 09:15 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 10,255
Right now on another website, we're having a big discussion about Barrow, Alaska because one of the posters is thinking about taking a job there. That place is awfully isolated.
#15
Old 09-10-2013, 09:16 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 4,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert_columbia View Post

For example, other than perhaps San Francisco, are there any "gay towns"?
Provincetown.
#16
Old 09-10-2013, 09:20 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Potomac
Posts: 32,888
Two small towns with only one access road:

Kaskaskia, Illinois, can only be accessed via State Route 15 from US 61 - in Missouri.

Grand Isle, Louisiana, can only be accessed via State Route 1 - a three hour drive from New Orleans. Nice beaches and the warmest water I've ever been in.

Last edited by Skywatcher; 09-10-2013 at 09:21 PM.
#17
Old 09-10-2013, 09:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: NH, USA
Posts: 1,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kolga View Post
In addition to being a gay resort town, P-town is geographically interesting, being all the way "down the cape" at the end of Cape Cod.
#18
Old 09-10-2013, 09:52 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 14
Polebridge, MT is pretty far out, and well worth the effort IMHO.
#19
Old 09-11-2013, 01:35 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Venial Sin City
Posts: 13,037
From the link, our classiest President seems to think Bohemian Grove is gay:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard M. Nixon
The Bohemian Grove, that I attend from time to time—the Easterners and the others come there—but it is the most faggy goddamn thing you could ever imagine, that San Francisco crowd that goes in there; it's just terrible! I mean I won't shake hands with anybody from San Francisco.
Despite what the movie/comic says, Barrow gets way more than 30 days of night. Also, parts of Alaska and elsewhere have pockets of Old Believers, who split from Russian Orthodoxy for reasons of, among other things, the need to cross yourself with two fingers and not three.
#20
Old 09-11-2013, 02:58 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,687
Boonville, California is noted for its made-up language, Boontling. Check it out on Wikipedia. Very entertaining.
#21
Old 09-11-2013, 04:38 AM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 247
Gay towns? Key West. On that same theme, Dry Tortugas National Park might be the most remote national park in the system, requiring a several hour ferry from Key West, which is rather isolated to begin with.
#22
Old 09-11-2013, 05:30 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Santa Barbara
Posts: 4,332
Well, Provincetown is pretty gay.

I was thinking if buying some property in Shelter Cove, CA. It's the perfect spot to survive a nuclear holocaust. Wiinds tend to be westerly, so fallout won't be much of a problem.
#23
Old 09-11-2013, 12:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 2,138
Pago Pago
#24
Old 09-11-2013, 12:21 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upper left hand corner
Posts: 5,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lute Skywatcher View Post
Two small towns with only one access road:

Kaskaskia, Illinois, can only be accessed via State Route 15 from US 61 - in Missouri.

Grand Isle, Louisiana, can only be accessed via State Route 1 - a three hour drive from New Orleans. Nice beaches and the warmest water I've ever been in.
How about zero access roads? Stehekin, Washington - 75 year round residents, great scenery and hiking.
#25
Old 09-11-2013, 12:23 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 27,301
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert_columbia View Post
For example, other than perhaps San Francisco, are there any "gay towns"?
Massachusetts has Provincetown, MA which is a trek to get to at the tip of Cape Cod if you drive and is well-known for being highly gay. It also has Northampton, MA (Lesbianville, USA).
#26
Old 09-11-2013, 12:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Chillicothe, Ohio
Posts: 5,871
Smith Island, Maryland, is an interesting little place in the middle of Chesapeake Bay near the Virginia border. You can get there by boat from Solomons, MD or Crisfield, MD, both of which are pretty out-of-the-way themselves. It's worth the trip just for the lunch at the restaurant where the boats land. Rent a bike or a golf cart and explore the whole island.
#27
Old 09-11-2013, 12:33 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 27,301
There are a whole bunch of islands off the coast of Maine that are only lightly inhabited, sometimes in the single digits. A few of them have regular ferry service so it isn't too hard to reach them as a visitor if you really want to. Come to think of it, Northern Maine has plenty of really remote areas in general even on the mainland.

See the Cranberry islands for some examples:

http://cranberryisles.com/visiting.html
#28
Old 09-11-2013, 12:41 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Sacratomato area
Posts: 2,902
You could hit all of the Extreme Points of the United States, or the towns nearby them.
#29
Old 09-11-2013, 12:56 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Slithering on the hull
Posts: 26,290
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsquire View Post
On that same theme, Dry Tortugas National Park might be the most remote national park in the system, requiring a several hour ferry from Key West, which is rather isolated to begin with.
I love the Dry Tortugas, but no way is the most remote park in the system. Isle Royale has fewer visitors at 16,009 anually. but one of the National Parks in Alaska, Kobuk Valley, averages less than 1000 visitors a year, IIRC. Dry Tortugas gets about 60,000.

least visited national parks
#30
Old 09-11-2013, 01:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,287
The northwestern edge of the Great Midwest Prairie (so that would be eastern Montana, eastern Wyoming [basically all of Wyoming is pretty void of human life], and western North Dakota) is really freaking remote. I lived in a town of 500 people in southeastern Montana that required you to drive 45 minutes in either direction before you could reach a grocery store. If my memory serves, I once drove the 3-hour trek to Gillette, WY without once encountering another car on the road.

There are a few destinations out there in the general vicinity that would make the trip worth it -- Devil's Tower in WY, Spearfish Canyon/Mt. Rushmore in western SD, for two. The drive from Sheridan, WY to Cody, WY is one of the most beautiful roads in America (the Big Horn Scenic Byway). You'd be near Yellowstone, too.

Last edited by gallows fodder; 09-11-2013 at 01:06 PM.
#31
Old 09-11-2013, 01:22 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 39,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
I love the Dry Tortugas, but no way is the most remote park in the system. Isle Royale has fewer visitors at 16,009 anually. but one of the National Parks in Alaska, Kobuk Valley, averages less than 1000 visitors a year, IIRC. Dry Tortugas gets about 60,000.

least visited national parks
He could also take a look at Aniakchak National Monument, a place I've always wanted to visit, but never got to. No indigenous people, only accessible by small float plane, Aniakchak is an extinct volcano, with a 6-mile wide caldera. They do rafting trips down the river that originates in the caldera and exits through the canyon created when the volcano blew. This is a truly remote and unique place. One of the first people to explore it thoroughly was Bernard Hubbard, S.J., who wrote a couple of books about his explorations of Southwest Alaska in the early part of the 20th century.
#32
Old 09-11-2013, 01:46 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 22,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
Supai, Arizona. Although it's adjacent to Grand Canyon National Park and it only takes a couple hours to get close to it from Flagstaff, Wikipedia calls it the most isolated community in the continental U.S. You can only get there by helicopter or foot/animal (around 10 miles) once you reach the plateau it's located under. Mail goes out by mule train every week.

Culturally, they aren't isolated more than the average Indian tribe since they make money from tourism, (combined of course with the differences from city life that come from being in an isolated small town.)

I have a feeling this physical isolation is partly on purpose, because on some maps there is a Jeep trail that leads to Supai. So there may have been a road there at one point that could have been improved but at some point they decided to just close it. Then again it may have been from the Grand Canyon park itself and I think there was a legal challenge the Supai Tribe had to go through to get as much land as they currently have back.
Supai is my favorite place in all the world. I have been there dozens of times. Currently, I have spent 54 days of my life there and I hope to spend more than 1 year total of my life in that canyon. In fact, I first came to Las Vegas to hike down there and moved here in part because it was close to Supai.

There is no Jeep trail down there, just a footpath that is also used by mules and horses.
The hike to the village takes 3-4 hours depending; the helicopter ride is about 8 minutes. Hiking out can take anywhere from 3-6 hours.

This canyon is hands-down the most beautiful place I have ever been. It is not easy to get to nor easy to hike from the campground to the Colorado, but it is my absolute favorite thing in the world to do. It is a breath-taking and breathtakingly beautiful journey; I think I have made that hike about 40 times.

If you are not an experienced backpacker, please plan your trip carefully and consult people who are experienced. The canyon can be a dangerous place if you don't know what you are doing. People who are afraid of heights should think three or four times before making this their destination.

ETA: Here is a picture I took of Havasu Falls, which is at the campground head, back in 1998 or so. It was taken from the trail. I have many (literally hundreds) of photos I have taken down there over the years. I have been in all seasons, but spring (April & May) is my favorite time to be down there.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 09-11-2013 at 01:50 PM.
#33
Old 09-11-2013, 02:01 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USofA
Posts: 3,630
Kiryas Joel is by no means remote (it's not far from NYC) but I think it would fit your other requirements. It's a predominately Hasidic village, the primary language is Yiddish, it's one of the youngest towns in the US, and also one of the poorest.

On a somewhat similar note, there are a number of towns in Maine that are predominantly French-speaking, though it may not seem all that exotic all the way up there near Quebec.

Gibsonton, Florida is known as a retirement town for circus/sideshow performers.
#34
Old 09-11-2013, 02:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USofA
Posts: 3,630
Oh, and of course there are the Amish towns in Pennsylvania and Ohio...well-known, yes, but definitely different, especially the ones off the tourist path.
#35
Old 09-11-2013, 02:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USofA
Posts: 3,630
A bit of a different response to your question, but maybe of interest... Kaiserslautern is a city of about 100,000 people in southwest Germany. On top of that there are about 50,000 Americans living there, associated with the US military, and making up the largest concentration of Americans outside the US. So it's kind of an American "town," but in a unique setting...
#36
Old 09-11-2013, 02:18 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 217
Cedar Key, Florida It's nowhere near the Florida Keys. In fact it's nowhere near anywhere.
#37
Old 09-11-2013, 02:20 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 77,330
One unusual set of "remote" locations are the various small islands in New York City. Some of them like City Island and Roosevelt Island have communities which are relatively isolated considering they're in the middle of one of the largest cities in the world. Others are uninhabited. Mill Rock, for example, used to be a city park that was accessible by boat but the city closed the park fifty years ago and let it "go back to nature". Or North Brother Island, which was the sight of a city-run hospital that also was closed back in the sixties.
#38
Old 09-11-2013, 02:28 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Bedrock
Posts: 26,079
I'm kinda partial to Lajitas. It's in the Texas Big Bend, lonely, remote, harsh and stunning beautiful desert. Terlingua is just down the road a piece if you need some groceries.

Another is Homer, AK. While it's Tom Bodette's 'End of the Road', it's not impossible to get to but you can't go far past it. It is though fairly exotic in a mountainous, glacial, artsy, ginormous halibut kind of way.
#39
Old 09-11-2013, 02:44 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 39,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieu View Post
Another is Homer, AK. While it's Tom Bodette's 'End of the Road', it's not impossible to get to but you can't go far past it. It is though fairly exotic in a mountainous, glacial, artsy, ginormous halibut kind of way.
It's known for being a more liberal, artsy community than most of Alaska, although there are some end-of-the-roaders there, also. Katchemak Bay is gloriously beautiful. Lots of tourists in the summer, though, taking fishing and touring charters off the Spit. It's also where Jewel Kilcher was from. For someone who wants to be more of a loner, it's not a bad place. Lots of kayak water, hiking areas, wildlife, etc. There's a shorebird festival there every year.

The town of McCarthy, AK (pop 30) might fit the bill. You can actually drive there via the old McCarthy Road off the Edgerton Highway. Very scenic, located near the headwaters of the Copper River and next to the now-defunct Kennecott Copper Mine. There are a few tourist-oriented businesses in the town and a charter air service. A flight down the Copper River to Cordova is money well spent.
#40
Old 09-11-2013, 03:02 PM
Charter Member
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Maine
Posts: 10,350
I came here to mention Stehekin, Washington, and the francophone communities of northern Maine but they've been mentioned already.

How about the towns in Alaska that can be driven to from Canada but not from the rest of Alaska. They are Skagway, Haines, and Hyder.

There's a settlement in Maine called Estcourt Station that you can't get to by public road except through Quebec. You can, however, get there from the rest of Maine on private logging roads if you pay a fee. Some of the houses were built before people knew where the boundary was and they turned out to straddle it. The people who live in those houses have a dispensation to cross the border to get to the bathroom without reporting to the border services.

On a similar note, there is a library that straddles the border between Stanstead, QC, and Derby Line, VT.
#41
Old 09-11-2013, 03:27 PM
Charter Member
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Maine
Posts: 10,350
Niihau is a privately owned island in Hawaii where the inhabitants speak Hawaiian. You can't visit without an invitation though.

Nikolaevsk, Alaska is a community of Russian Old Believers. It happens to be not far from Homer, as mentioned above.

For a true end-of-the-road experience I guess you could drive to Deadhorse, Alaska on the Dalton Highway. There's nothing very scenic or inviting once you get there though.
#42
Old 09-11-2013, 04:30 PM
ftg ftg is offline
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Not the PNW :-(
Posts: 16,890
Arock, Oregon, like most places in SE Oregon, is fairly remote. But it was founded by Basque sheepherders. Still quite a few around. So, a bit remote and with a touch of the exotic (if you consider European language-isolate speakers exotic).

Not too far away is the gravesite of Jean Baptiste Charbonneau, son of Sacajawea, born during the Lewis and Clark expedition.

The area is "Owyhee country". Some of the earliest miners came from Owhyee, aka Hawaii. But the Hawaiian culture died out. Too bad. I bet Basque-Hawaiian cuisine would have been interesting.
#43
Old 09-11-2013, 04:38 PM
Shouting Grasshopper
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Meridian/280
Posts: 13,296
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieu View Post
I'm kinda partial to Lajitas. It's in the Texas Big Bend, lonely, remote, harsh and stunning beautiful desert.
Lajitas' most famous resident: Clay Henry, the beer-drinking goat (now deceased and stuffed).
#44
Old 09-11-2013, 04:44 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 22,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by aesop View Post
Cedar Key, Florida It's nowhere near the Florida Keys. In fact it's nowhere near anywhere.
Cedar Key is very near the Florida Keys; it's one of them. It isn't near the southern Keys, true, but it is an island with a limestone base which is the result of a coral reef and changing sea levels, which is what defines a key.

It's also a beautiful little island with excellent kayaking/canoeing and snorkeling/scuba diving opportunities.
#45
Old 09-11-2013, 04:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: the western edge.
Posts: 2,793
Great Basin National Park is a strange treasure, although not a town. It is surrounded by desert but is alpine, it's a mountain, with, like, snow. Also has some interesting caves.
#46
Old 09-11-2013, 04:53 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 39,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by bibliophage View Post
For a true end-of-the-road experience I guess you could drive to Deadhorse, Alaska on the Dalton Highway. There's nothing very scenic or inviting once you get there though.
I did that drive and you're right. Not only is there not much there, you're not allowed to roam freely. You'd be better off driving to Inuvik, NWT on the Dempster Highway. Scenic rivers, free ferry crossings, First Nation town at the top of the world.
#47
Old 09-11-2013, 05:09 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Bedrock
Posts: 26,079
There's the Deadhorse General Store that's pretty cool, but that's seen in ten minutes. Then just the novelty of laying on a rocky beach counting ice floes. If you're lucky on the way up you'll see some Musk Ox or a Grizz.

Last edited by lieu; 09-11-2013 at 05:09 PM.
#48
Old 09-11-2013, 05:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,386
Yellow Pine, Idaho. not the most remote town in the state, but it is pretty remote and smack dab in the middle of the forest and mountains. It's beautiful and it has a harmonica festival every year in August. If you want to be there with thousands of campers and see some harmonica players go then. If you want to visit with the 100 or so full time residents, go in July. Do not try to go in January. You won't make it in without a snow mobile.
#49
Old 09-11-2013, 08:36 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 10,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
There's Point Roberts, Washington which is physically separated from the rest of the United States - you have to drive through Canada to reach it.
Angle Inlet, Minnesota too, although the landmass is connected.
#50
Old 09-11-2013, 08:44 PM
Shouting Grasshopper
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Meridian/280
Posts: 13,296
Quote:
Originally Posted by movingfinger View Post
Boonville, California is noted for its made-up language, Boontling. Check it out on Wikipedia. Very entertaining.
Stop in at Anderson Valley Brewing Co. for a pint! If the mood strikes, they have a frisbee golf course on the property.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethilrist View Post
Mono Hot Springs, in the Sierra Nevada range, is a bit hard to get to. Beautiful area, great hiking, trout fishing, and hot springs.
I've wanted to go there for years...is the road up there as scary as I've read?
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:35 AM.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: [email protected]

Send comments about this website to:

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: pinky narf dayquil cause diarrhea graying beard huge penis jokes sour sprees full blooded indians pepper hart iafd argentine pronunciation headset sound reversed buttfuck egypt tasmanian devil pet songs about douchebags need a car in chicago plug in hard drive while computer is on difference between peanut and groundnut why is rocket science so hard 2000 ford taurus egr valve how to euthanize a snake did hitler speak english when was electricity in homes is f(x) the same as y how to straighten a cord sore throat after singing i don't have a mobile phone for yahoo how to get braces glue off teeth at home