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#1
Old 10-04-2014, 04:14 PM
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Skip forever, Yahoo, I'm not giving you my fucking phone number!

Fuck you, you idiots.

I have four Yahoo mail accounts (one of which is for the SDMB). About every three or four weeks I make the rounds to see what's showed up. For more or less the last two years Yahoo has offered the opportunity to recover access to my account via text message to my phone. "Well only use this number for important messages." Yeah, right.

For each account, every three weeks.

That doesn't irritate me so much as this: this is what irritates me: this is what pisses me off: this is what grates on my last nerve: "Skip for now".

Fuck you, Yahoo. I NEVER want this option. I am not going to give you my phone now; I will never give you my phone number ever; my heirs will not give you what my phone number used to be. Where is the "skip forever, fuck off and die in a fire, if you ever offer me this again your cats will be killed by snipers" option?

I'm just asking.
#2
Old 10-04-2014, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post
Fuck you, you idiots.

I have four Yahoo mail accounts (one of which is for the SDMB). About every three or four weeks I make the rounds to see what's showed up. For more or less the last two years Yahoo has offered the opportunity to recover access to my account via text message to my phone. "We’ll only use this number for important messages." Yeah, right.

For each account, every three weeks.

That doesn't irritate me so much as this: this is what irritates me: this is what pisses me off: this is what grates on my last nerve: "Skip for now".

Fuck you, Yahoo. I NEVER want this option. I am not going to give you my phone now; I will never give you my phone number ever; my heirs will not give you what my phone number used to be. Where is the "skip forever, fuck off and die in a fire, if you ever offer me this again your cats will be killed by snipers" option?

I'm just asking.
My AOL account* does the same thing. I wonder what would happen if I just dropped a fake number in?

*yes, I still have an AOL email address. It's actually my main email address. I use it all the time but it gets almost no spam since I've been pretty good with it since I got it, what, 20+ years ago.

ETA, if you do that you better make sure to remember the number in case they ever need it for a password reset or something like that.

Last edited by Joey P; 10-04-2014 at 04:21 PM.
#3
Old 10-04-2014, 04:20 PM
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If you don't pay for the product then YOU'RE the product.

A truism I read on this board recently.
#4
Old 10-04-2014, 04:27 PM
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When I log into my GMail account directly on the Internet, I am always presented with a fat banner across the top demanding my phone number.

Dicks.
#5
Old 10-04-2014, 04:33 PM
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Well, maybe they think you'll change your mind someday.
#6
Old 10-04-2014, 04:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cartooniverse View Post
When I log into my GMail account directly on the Internet, I am always presented with a fat banner across the top demanding my phone number.
That I haven't seen. My gmail account came with the phone I bought about a year ago, and I do see ads. But that's on the screen with my email, I can ignore them. The Yahoo bullshit is a full screen after I log in but before I get to my email. I have to either give my number, or select "skip for now".

[more general]
Frankly, I'm getting tired of Yahoo. They've been my home page for more than a decade, primarily for news aggregation. Now their news is half ads, and half of the rest is International Business Times and Huffington Post type bullshit.

I'm about ready to dump them as a home page and as a news aggregator and as an email provider. They've really arrive at the point where all they want to give me is shit, and I'm not interested in eating it.
#7
Old 10-04-2014, 05:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post
Frankly, I'm getting tired of Yahoo. They've been my home page for more than a decade, primarily for news aggregation. Now their news is half ads, and half of the rest is International Business Times and Huffington Post type bullshit.

I'm about ready to dump them as a home page and as a news aggregator and as an email provider. They've really arrive at the point where all they want to give me is shit, and I'm not interested in eating it.
I miss iGoogle. I currently use this tool with firefox: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/fir...vd-speed-dial/

It provides a bunch of buttons for different websites. YMMV, etc.
#8
Old 10-04-2014, 05:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kk fusion View Post
If you don't pay for the product then YOU'RE the product.

A truism I read on this board recently.
Which would make me a product of the SDMB.

I now feel smuggly self superior and dirty at the same time.
#9
Old 10-04-2014, 05:57 PM
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^^^^^

There's a relatively inexpensive way to fix that.
#10
Old 10-05-2014, 01:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post
Fuck you, you idiots.

I have four Yahoo mail accounts (one of which is for the SDMB). About every three or four weeks I make the rounds to see what's showed up. For more or less the last two years Yahoo has offered the opportunity to recover access to my account via text message to my phone. "Well only use this number for important messages." Yeah, right.

For each account, every three weeks.

That doesn't irritate me so much as this: this is what irritates me: this is what pisses me off: this is what grates on my last nerve: "Skip for now".

Fuck you, Yahoo. I NEVER want this option. I am not going to give you my phone now; I will never give you my phone number ever; my heirs will not give you what my phone number used to be. Where is the "skip forever, fuck off and die in a fire, if you ever offer me this again your cats will be killed by snipers" option?

I'm just asking.
To set up new yahoo account now you must enter phone number and the same with youtube.Part of this is to stop spam.

They will send you activation code to your phone so putting in a fake phone number will not work.

I never had any of these problems two years ago.I use to have old yahoo account and youtube account but forgot it. And now I cannot make yahoo account or youtube account with out putting in phone number.

You can't put in a fake number you need the activation code to make new account.
#11
Old 10-05-2014, 04:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post
"Well only use this number for important messages." Yeah, right.
They legitimately won't use the number for anything but emergency recovery. There's not really that much else you can do with a phone number that wouldn't immediately backfire.

Email providers are in a uniquely tough spot regarding account security. For every other service, if you're locked out, the provider can recover your account by sending you an email. If your email account gets locked out, that's it, it's gone for good since there's no way for the email provider to prove that you're the rightful owner.

Because of how the web is structured, losing your email is hugely consequential. Most sites won't let you change your linked email account without clicking a confirmation link to your old email. Some sites won't let you change your password or delete your account without confirming via email.

Just enter the damn phone number and reply to a single text. Email providers are legitimately looking out for your best interests in this case.
#12
Old 10-05-2014, 04:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalmanese View Post
They legitimately won't use the number for anything but emergency recovery. There's not really that much else you can do with a phone number that wouldn't immediately backfire.

Email providers are in a uniquely tough spot regarding account security. For every other service, if you're locked out, the provider can recover your account by sending you an email. If your email account gets locked out, that's it, it's gone for good since there's no way for the email provider to prove that you're the rightful owner.

Because of how the web is structured, losing your email is hugely consequential. Most sites won't let you change your linked email account without clicking a confirmation link to your old email. Some sites won't let you change your password or delete your account without confirming via email.

Just enter the damn phone number and reply to a single text. Email providers are legitimately looking out for your best interests in this case.
Other option is to buy throw away phone to set up a account. If you don't want them to have you number.
#13
Old 10-05-2014, 05:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Other option is to buy throw away phone to set up a account. If you don't want them to have you number.
When they send a verification code to that number in a year's time, your account is toast.
#14
Old 10-05-2014, 05:13 AM
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Google has had my phone number for several years. It's not super-secret or anything. I don't see the big deal.
The only time I ever get a text from them is if I change the password on my gmail (I have four accounts) for verification.
#15
Old 10-05-2014, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tellyworth View Post
When they send a verification code to that number in a year's time, your account is toast.
You need number to set up new account.Most of this is to stop spam.
#16
Old 10-05-2014, 02:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
To set up new yahoo account now you must enter phone number and the same with youtube.Part of this is to stop spam.

They will send you activation code to your phone so putting in a fake phone number will not work.

I never had any of these problems two years ago.I use to have old yahoo account and youtube account but forgot it. And now I cannot make yahoo account or youtube account with out putting in phone number.

You can't put in a fake number you need the activation code to make new account.
How is this possible when YouTube is not owned by Yahoo, but by Google?
#17
Old 10-05-2014, 02:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cochrane View Post
How is this possible when YouTube is not owned by Yahoo, but by Google?
Read it again. He's claiming that Yahoo and Google have similar policies. (I haven't tried setting up a new account with either though, so I can't vouch.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalmanese View Post
They legitimately won't use the number for anything but emergency recovery. There's not really that much else you can do with a phone number that wouldn't immediately backfire.....
Just enter the damn phone number and reply to a single text. Email providers are legitimately looking out for your best interests in this case.
Yahoo can be hacked, which would put the phone number in the hands of all manner of spammers and scammers.

It may indeed be smart to pass your phone number on to your mission-critical email account provider. Not so sure about the others.

Last edited by Measure for Measure; 10-05-2014 at 02:40 PM.
#18
Old 10-05-2014, 03:03 PM
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This is the main reason why we still have a land line. I can give the number to anyone and not worry about it because we never answer that phone - everything goes to voice mail. And so far I haven't found anything that requires we be able to receive a text, since not everyone has that ability yet.
#19
Old 10-05-2014, 10:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Measure for Measure View Post
Read it again. He's claiming that Yahoo and Google have similar policies. (I haven't tried setting up a new account with either though, so I can't vouch.) Yahoo can be hacked, which would put the phone number in the hands of all manner of spammers and scammers.
His post wasn't very clear on that point. In fact, since this is the Pit and I can say it here, most of sweat209's posts make me go WTF?

Last edited by cochrane; 10-05-2014 at 10:57 PM.
#20
Old 10-05-2014, 11:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cochrane View Post
His post wasn't very clear on that point. In fact, since this is the Pit and I can say it here, most of sweat209's posts make me go WTF?
I feel like I'm in school with a strict grammar teacher

Any ways I had no need to activate my phone with yahoo.And if I made new account no matter what using a phone or not, I will put it down on paper the username, email and password


I'm not going to put much faith into yahoo to recover a forgotten username, e-mail or password.

Last edited by sweat209; 10-05-2014 at 11:29 PM.
#21
Old 10-06-2014, 05:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curlcoat View Post
And so far I haven't found anything that requires we be able to receive a text, since not everyone has that ability yet.
They usually offer a choice between a text or an automated call.
#22
Old 10-06-2014, 06:49 AM
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I'm extremely protective about my cell number. I have caller ID blocked and only give my number to good friends. When my phone rings, I know it will be someone I know.

All that aside, I've given Google my number. They're cool.
#23
Old 10-06-2014, 07:38 AM
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I was glad that Google finally wised up and stopped asking. If someone says no every single time you ask, they probably aren't willing to give it to you. Yahoo hasn't stopped asking, and now requires it to set up an account. I actually had a huge rant against Gmail for a while for dropping SMS support, and almost signed up for Yahoo until I realized I had to give them a phone number to even set up an account.

The landline idea is nice--but there's not one landline per person, and most of the things I've seen want to text you for confirmation. YouTube was actually the first place I'd seen that offers a voice option. I'm sure that's because they own Google Voice and thus can easily not accept those throwaway numbers.

They aren't looking out for my best interests. The only excuse they can come up with for requiring my number is that they can help me if I lose my password or have unauthorized access. But I've already given them an alternative email for that purpose.

The anti-spam idea is pretty much all that makes sense. Hence why YouTube requires a number to go over 15 minutes. But that only works if they are limiting you to one account per number. And that's not how I use email.
#24
Old 10-06-2014, 09:36 AM
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Google hasn't stopped asking me, and I've said "no" consistently.
#25
Old 10-06-2014, 06:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post
Fuck you, you idiots.

I have four Yahoo mail accounts (one of which is for the SDMB). About every three or four weeks I make the rounds to see what's showed up. For more or less the last two years Yahoo has offered the opportunity to recover access to my account via text message to my phone. "Well only use this number for important messages." Yeah, right.

For each account, every three weeks.

That doesn't irritate me so much as this: this is what irritates me: this is what pisses me off: this is what grates on my last nerve: "Skip for now".

Fuck you, Yahoo. I NEVER want this option. I am not going to give you my phone now; I will never give you my phone number ever; my heirs will not give you what my phone number used to be. Where is the "skip forever, fuck off and die in a fire, if you ever offer me this again your cats will be killed by snipers" option?

I'm just asking.
Guess you get what you pay for there guy.
#26
Old 10-06-2014, 06:43 PM
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What if Yahoo is having a party and they realize at the last minute that they forgot to ask you, so they go to call you with directions and a request to pick up a couple bags of ice on your way? What then?
#27
Old 10-06-2014, 08:04 PM
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I'm worried yahoo will order 20 pizzas and send them to my house.
#28
Old 10-07-2014, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Measure for Measure View Post
Yahoo can be hacked, which would put the phone number in the hands of all manner of spammers and scammers.
That's not what the OP is complaining about though, he seems to think Yahoo will use the phone number for some nefarious marketing purpose.

Anyway, if you're afraid that Yahoo might get hacked, then certainly don't maintain 4 email accounts with them. Between those 4 accounts I'm guessing there's a lot more personal info than a phone number.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigT View Post
They aren't looking out for my best interests. The only excuse they can come up with for requiring my number is that they can help me if I lose my password or have unauthorized access. But I've already given them an alternative email for that purpose.
Security folks will tell you that out-of-band password recovery is much more secure than using an alternate email address. If your computer/network is compromised, sending password/reset info to another email address can very well make the problem worse. On the other hand, it's much less likely that your phone AND your computer/network have been compromised.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigT View Post
If someone says no every single time you ask, they probably aren't willing to give it to you.
I can agree with this. They probably shouldn't *require* it, but I guess they think that's the best way to avoid future security and PR headaches.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post
Frankly, I'm getting tired of Yahoo. They've been my home page for more than a decade, primarily for news aggregation. Now their news is half ads, and half of the rest is International Business Times and Huffington Post type bullshit.

I'm about ready to dump them as a home page and as a news aggregator and as an email provider. They've really arrive at the point where all they want to give me is shit, and I'm not interested in eating it.
Well, pit them for that then. Apparently at one time you liked their service enough that you created 4 accounts with them. But now they're struggling and doing what they think they need to survive, and it's certainly your right to think they suck because of that. But pitting them for the phone number thing is silly. I'll eat my hat if it turns out they do use it for some marketing purpose.

If it bothers you that much, use a google voice number. This is exactly the sort of thing that was designed for. Of course, one day if/when google decides to start charging for this service, I guess we'll see another round of pittings.
#29
Old 10-07-2014, 02:55 PM
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Also, the other thing about alternate email recovery is that a lot of people think they're being extremely clever by having Email B be the recovery from Email A and Email A be the recovery of Email B.

Now, some hacker breaks into Email B and sees that the recovery address is Email A. They send a "forgot my password" request to Email A which dutifully sends the recovery info to Email B and now the hacker has two email accounts that you will never ever be able to recover ever again.

Seriously, don't do this!
#30
Old 10-07-2014, 04:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arseNal View Post
That's not what the OP is complaining about though, he seems to think Yahoo will use the phone number for some nefarious marketing purpose.
That is what I think. When I last had a land-line, I would get about five or six phone calls every day. About one out of every 30 of those calls was a call from someone I actually was willing to talk to. That's with my number registered with both state and national no-call lists. I've no interest in that happening to my cell.

I don't see any reason to trust that Yahoo won't sell or share my number, at some point. When they get broke enough, or when they get sleazy enough, or when they think it's best business practice.
#31
Old 10-07-2014, 04:44 PM
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This is what happens when you put a skirt in charge of things. Now all she does all day is drink wine coolers and troll Yahoo accounts for guys' numbers. Pathetic really.
#32
Old 10-07-2014, 05:02 PM
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just stopping by to point out that I just paid up for another year at SDMB, and they required a phone number. I tried skipping it, but I couldn't go forward. I ended up just making one up. I can't imagine anything important enough that I just have to get a phone call from Cecil.
#33
Old 10-07-2014, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arseNal View Post
Security folks will tell you that out-of-band password recovery is much more secure than using an alternate email address. If your computer/network is compromised, sending password/reset info to another email address can very well make the problem worse. On the other hand, it's much less likely that your phone AND your computer/network have been compromised.
This. There are three main reasons email providers want your number:

1. Recovery, in the event that your account is compromised.

2. Limiting bogus accounts. A phone number gives them higher confidence yours is a real account, and not stockpiled by spammers.

3. Two factor auth. If someone tries to log in from a suspicious location, they can text you a confirmation code.

Those are all good things that benefit the owner of the account. And they can't reliably be achieved with a secondary email address (if you've lost one password, chances are even higher that you've lost the password to your secondary account too).
#34
Old 10-07-2014, 05:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
They will send you activation code to your phone so putting in a fake phone number will not work.
And if I don't own a cell phone? Then what? I can't use Yahoo mail?
#35
Old 10-07-2014, 06:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post
That is what I think. When I last had a land-line, I would get about five or six phone calls every day. About one out of every 30 of those calls was a call from someone I actually was willing to talk to. That's with my number registered with both state and national no-call lists. I've no interest in that happening to my cell.

I don't see any reason to trust that Yahoo won't sell or share my number, at some point. When they get broke enough, or when they get sleazy enough, or when they think it's best business practice.
Most landlines were probably publicly listed at one point, so if that's the case it was freely available for telemarketers to have put into their databases ages ago and have sold and re-sold to other telemarketers over the years. And we all know the do-not-call registries are often ignored by the telemarketers.

Call me naive, but I really do doubt that Yahoo would blatantly renege on what they explicitly say they won't do with the mobile number. And in any case, like I said, you can always use a google voice number, which is ideal for precisely this purpose. Then you can finally just give Yahoo a number once and for all and their kitties don't have to die a horrible death from afar.
#36
Old 10-07-2014, 07:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Procrustus View Post
just stopping by to point out that I just paid up for another year at SDMB, and they required a phone number. I tried skipping it, but I couldn't go forward. I ended up just making one up. I can't imagine anything important enough that I just have to get a phone call from Cecil.
Was it the SDMB, or the payment processor, PayPal? I just re-upped last week and as far as I can remember, the SDMB itself doesn't ask for anything - you just go through to PayPal and pay and come back to the SDMB.

PayPal needs your phone number like any credit card processor does.
#37
Old 10-07-2014, 09:12 PM
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Many of us have different free e-mail accounts for different classes of correspondents. Where I live, SIM cards are available for 50 cents or so -- why not have throwaway SIMs to go with the throwaway e-mail accounts?
#38
Old 10-07-2014, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arseNal View Post
Security folks will tell you that out-of-band password recovery is much more secure than using an alternate email address. If your computer/network is compromised, sending password/reset info to another email address can very well make the problem worse. On the other hand, it's much less likely that your phone AND your computer/network have been compromised
That may make sense in theory, but not in practice. First off, it assumes that I save the password to my security email account in the clear somewhere on my computer. And that they have gotten through any security I have set up on said computer.

Second, and more importantly, I'm going to be logged in to my main email address on my phone. It's kinda a necessity with the way smartphones work these days. And between my laptop and my phone, which am I most likely to lose?

Not that they could tell that there was any fraudulent activity if I get compromised on my own equipment. The way such activity is detected is that it comes from an unusual location. And this makes sense--that is the much, much more likely way my account would be compromised. Getting physical access is a lot more work.

The only way to protect your equipment from being compromised is to directly protect your equipment from being compromised, both physically and with encryption. None of this other stuff actually helps in that situation. And outside that situation, an alternate email works just as well.

(Yes, even for two factor authentication. You might say that using a phone would be more convenient, but that depends on the circumstance. Which is probably why it's always optional.)
#39
Old 10-07-2014, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
Was it the SDMB, or the payment processor, PayPal? I just re-upped last week and as far as I can remember, the SDMB itself doesn't ask for anything - you just go through to PayPal and pay and come back to the SDMB.

PayPal needs your phone number like any credit card processor does.
I don't have a paypal account, but it probably was on the payment page. Anyway, I made up a number and it worked
#40
Old 10-07-2014, 10:42 PM
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Skip forever, Yahoo, I'm not giving you my fucking phone number!

Regardless of your relationship with PayPal, they are still the payment processor for the SDMB. They require a phone number like any other payment processor. You did not give your phone number to "Cecil."

Interesting that you were cool with providing a way to charge you money, but you were scared that they might have the ability to call you.

Last edited by ZipperJJ; 10-07-2014 at 10:45 PM.
#41
Old 10-07-2014, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
Regardless of your relationship with PayPal, they are still the payment processor for the SDMB. They require a phone number like any other payment processor.
PayPal doesn't have my phone number, but then my account is very old.
#42
Old 10-08-2014, 09:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigT View Post
That may make sense in theory, but not in practice. First off, it assumes that I save the password to my security email account in the clear somewhere on my computer. And that they have gotten through any security I have set up on said computer.
How so? Remember emails can be intercepted -- an MTA along the way can be hacked, maybe a rogue ISP employee. That's very unlikely you say? Well then I'm sure you'll be comfortable sending an email from your yahoo account to your gmail account containing all your usernames, passwords, and credit card numbers just to test this comfort level. After all they're both webmail with https right?

Besides, we were (at least I was) talking about a situation where the user may have already been compromised. After all, that's a very likely time when they'd be trying to change his password. So, the user's computer/network may be already under control by an attacker, this is the worst time for the user to give him a way to now take over an email account.

Finally, it's not useful just for password recovery. It could be a simple alert to tell you that your account security settings have changed. You don't see the value in receiving that as a text message instead of an email to some alternate address?
Quote:
Second, and more importantly, I'm going to be logged in to my main email address on my phone. It's kinda a necessity with the way smartphones work these days. And between my laptop and my phone, which am I most likely to lose?
It's true that with emails and text messaging taking place on the same device, the definition of "out-of-band" becomes a little hazy, and the security industry will have to solve for it. But most users still do most of their internet activity from a PC. There are still a gazillion outlook users out there. Besides, a text message can still be out of band in some situations -- in the aforementioned rogue MTA/ISP, for example.
Quote:
Not that they could tell that there was any fraudulent activity if I get compromised on my own equipment. The way such activity is detected is that it comes from an unusual location.
We're not only talking about situations where your email provider has proactively detected intrusion. The user can be changing his password for whatever reason.
#43
Old 10-08-2014, 10:14 AM
Just Lovely and Delicious
Charter Member
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 24,472
Quote:
Originally Posted by curlcoat View Post
PayPal doesn't have my phone number, but then my account is very old.
Procrustus doesn't have a PayPal account, which is probably why they need his phone number to process his credit card payment, being that they are the SDMB payment processor. Just like when you go to any other site and buy something and they ask for your billing phone number.
#44
Old 10-08-2014, 11:12 AM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 31,112
Putting a fake phone number in won't actually do jackshit. BECAUSE then gmail/yahoo will stop you every 3-4 weeks to verify your number. Jackasses. I have my cell number in there, just in case I need to recover - Gmail has everything in it - and they still check with me periodically.

Last edited by Anaamika; 10-08-2014 at 11:12 AM.
#45
Old 10-08-2014, 01:23 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: S Cal
Posts: 6,020
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
Procrustus doesn't have a PayPal account, which is probably why they need his phone number to process his credit card payment, being that they are the SDMB payment processor. Just like when you go to any other site and buy something and they ask for your billing phone number.
Oooohhhhh. I guess I've never made a PayPal payment without going thru my account.
#46
Old 10-08-2014, 02:47 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,524
AdBlock is the problem. Yahoo is trying shed accounts that use ad blockers. What is the point of providing services to someone who won't accept advertising? So they've implemented an array of annoyances for "customers' who block, including endless plays for a cell number and service outages.
#47
Old 12-20-2016, 02:32 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 1
Is this even legal?

There must be at least one country in the world that has banned asking for phone numbers while putting in a password.
Does anyone know? Maybe I could get on to yahoo or other problem sites using the tor browser (changes the country you appear to be in.)
Most of these big companies obey laws even if they don't agree with them.
#48
Old 12-20-2016, 05:35 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 26,754
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
To set up new yahoo account now you must enter phone number and the same with youtube.Part of this is to stop spam.

They will send you activation code to your phone so putting in a fake phone number will not work.
Which pretty much sucks if you don't have a smart phone. Guess they don't want my business. They can't text my phone because my phone doesn't do texting.
#49
Old 12-21-2016, 07:25 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 10,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Which pretty much sucks if you don't have a smart phone. Guess they don't want my business. They can't text my phone because my phone doesn't do texting.
You don't need a smartphone for texting. SMS predates the proliferation of smartphones by over 2 decades. I'm actually somewhat amazed you can still buy a phone at all that doesn't do texting.
#50
Old 12-21-2016, 04:30 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 26,754
My phone is a really old phone and doesn't do texting. I take pretty good care of my stuff so it seldom breaks, and given my budget, upgrading a phone isn't on the table unless it breaks.
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