Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 05-05-2015, 12:28 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Barsoom
Posts: 4,023
"Oh, no she didn't", with the second "D" silent

I'm pop culture impaired. Where exactly did this come from?
#2
Old 05-05-2015, 12:44 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 12,773
I don't know, but maybe we can trace it back by earliest cite. I heard it on How I Met Your Mother several years ago. I'll see if I can track down the episode.
#3
Old 05-05-2015, 12:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: up the coast
Posts: 4,417
It comes from AAVE (African-American Vernacular English) aka Black English aka Ebonics, and can be cited at least to the early 1990s. It's almost certainly older than that, and it probably does not have a clearly-defined origin.
Even figuring out exactly when it crossed into broader usage is going to be tough to pin down.
#4
Old 05-05-2015, 12:59 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 536
It sounds more like a Punch N Judy show than ebonics, to me. And that's WAY older than 1990.

Last edited by misling; 05-05-2015 at 12:59 PM.
#5
Old 05-05-2015, 01:03 PM
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by misling View Post
It sounds more like a Punch N Judy show than ebonics, to me. And that's WAY older than 1990.
In American usage, it's certainly an imitation of African-American usage, not Punch and Judy.
#6
Old 05-05-2015, 01:07 PM
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by misling View Post
It sounds more like a Punch N Judy show than ebonics, to me. And that's WAY older than 1990.
Incidentally, this is what we're talking about.

From Big Bang Theory: (0:22)

Last edited by Colibri; 05-05-2015 at 01:11 PM.
#7
Old 05-05-2015, 01:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Barsoom
Posts: 4,023
Then there's this.
#8
Old 05-05-2015, 01:32 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Schenectady, NY, USA
Posts: 41,380
It's a common accent here in Schenectady -- a baby cat is a ki'in. And they'd say "I di'int go."

All the people I've heard it were either of Italian or Polish descent.
__________________
"If a person saying he was something was all there was to it, this country'd be full of rich men and good-looking women. Too bad it isn't that easy.... In short, when someone else says you're a writer, that's when you're a writer... not before."
Purveyor of fine science fiction since 1982.

Last edited by RealityChuck; 05-05-2015 at 01:33 PM.
#9
Old 05-05-2015, 01:39 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 30,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by panamajack View Post
It comes from AAVE (African-American Vernacular English) aka Black English aka Ebonics, and can be cited at least to the early 1990s. It's almost certainly older than that, and it probably does not have a clearly-defined origin.
Even figuring out exactly when it crossed into broader usage is going to be tough to pin down.
That link is from 1999.
Quote:
By now, of course, the catchphrase is well and truly played out.
Linquists are no better predicting the future than anyone else.
#10
Old 05-05-2015, 01:45 PM
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
It's a common accent here in Schenectady -- a baby cat is a ki'in. And they'd say "I di'int go."

All the people I've heard it were either of Italian or Polish descent.
In the Bronx when I was growing up we'd say di'int as well regardless of ethnicity. That kind of glottal stop is present in New York City accents in general. Water: whaw'uh, quarter: caw'uh, shuttle: shu'ul. It's also present in some British dialects.

However, the phrase in question as cited in the OP isn't just a simple glottal stop. There's a particular emphasis on the first syllable: Oh no she DI'int, making it sound sassy. And it's generally used for emphasis, to express the fact that what was done was extreme or surprising.
#11
Old 05-05-2015, 01:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: La Rive Ouest
Posts: 9,704
Wild guesses might be frowned upon in GQ ... but this sounds like something that might have been popularized by early 1990s TV programs like Martin or In Living Color. Perhaps a movie from around the same time. Or perhaps it was in some stand-up comedian's repetoire, and said comedian got on HBO or Showtime at some point.

It's interesting that an expression like "You been here FOUR HOUR!" has a well-defined starting point (in the late John Pinnette's stand-up routine), but some other expressions are harder to pin down.
#12
Old 05-05-2015, 02:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: South Bay
Posts: 83,793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
In the Bronx when I was growing up we'd say di'int as well regardless of ethnicity. That kind of glottal stop is present in New York City accents in general. Water: whaw'uh, quarter: caw'uh, shuttle: shu'ul. It's also present in some British dialects.

However, the phrase in question as cited in the OP isn't just a simple glottal stop. There's a particular emphasis on the first syllable: Oh no she DI'int, making it sound sassy. And it's generally used for emphasis, to express the fact that what was done was extreme or surprising.
Yeah, the silent "d" in "didn't" is pretty much standard American diction. Most people probably aren't aware that they aren't pronouncing the "d" in that word. It's not "dint", but "di - nt"
#13
Old 05-05-2015, 02:04 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: up the coast
Posts: 4,417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post
That link is from 1999.

Linquists are no better predicting the future than anyone else.
Only the latest cite is from 1999. I think you missed the first cite given that indicates the pronunciation:
-------------

From: Enuma Olanrewaju Ogunyemi
Subject: Re: Black labels
Date: 1993/09/07
Message-ID: <26irmb$gu9 at senator-bedfellow.MIT.EDU>
Newsgroup: alt.rap

Again you are being unnecessarily rude. BTW a lot of English folk
don't think Americans speak proper English, so using statements like
"Webster and the rest of reasonable (no you di'int!!) society"
doesn't mean much outside the U.S.

-------------

Totally agree on the comment about played out. That posting is from 2004.

I wouldn't be surprised if it was a show like Martin (which has it's own good example of glottalization ) that popularized it.
#14
Old 05-05-2015, 02:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Posts: 10,998
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
Yeah, the silent "d" in "didn't" is pretty much standard American diction. Most people probably aren't aware that they aren't pronouncing the "d" in that word. It's not "dint", but "di - nt"
I don't think that's right. Most people do actually pronounce the d in didn't. Common American diction has lots of T-glottalization, but I don't think it extends to "didn't".
#15
Old 05-05-2015, 02:26 PM
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,391
It might be noted that the full expression generally includes a finger-wag. Or several of them ending in a snap.


Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
Yeah, the silent "d" in "didn't" is pretty much standard American diction. Most people probably aren't aware that they aren't pronouncing the "d" in that word. It's not "dint", but "di - nt"
Maybe (although I pronounce it when I'm speaking standard American rather than my native Bronxese), but the glottal stop if present is not as distinct as it is in a New York accent, and it is deliberately exaggerated in the phrase in question.

Last edited by Colibri; 05-05-2015 at 02:28 PM.
#16
Old 05-05-2015, 04:51 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: NY (Manhattan) NY USA
Posts: 19,775
Do I correctly understand that you are not merely asking about the word "didn't" being pronounced with the second d elided, but, instead, about an entire phrase, "Oh no she di'nt"?

And it's a catchphrase?

And I would have heard it before where, and when?

** plays link ** **shrugs ** EDITED TO ADD: and in the link she's saying "Oh no YOU di'nt", btw /EDITED

Never heard it or heard of it outside this thread.

Last edited by AHunter3; 05-05-2015 at 04:52 PM.
#17
Old 05-05-2015, 06:14 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 831
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
Yeah, the silent "d" in "didn't" is pretty much standard American diction. Most people probably aren't aware that they aren't pronouncing the "d" in that word. It's not "dint", but "di - nt"
I spent about 75% of my teens in Massachusetts, 90% of my adult life in NC and VA and have spent weeks in MD, TX and CA. I doubt I have heard anyone say "dint" (di'int, whatever) more than about twice in 50 years, and that includes listening to plenty of Blacks as well as Whites. Maybe I just look like a grammar policeman outfitted to hunt bear and the potential wrongdoers are intimidated. Good. They need to be.
#18
Old 05-05-2015, 07:35 PM
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHunter3 View Post
And it's a catchphrase?

And I would have heard it before where, and when?

...

Never heard it or heard of it outside this thread.
It's a well known catch-phrase/meme. I'm not particularly up with popular culture and don't watch much regular TV but I've heard it frequently. Any number of examples can be found with a Google search.

If you don't watch a lot of TV you might have missed it.
#19
Old 05-05-2015, 09:03 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 30,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by panamajack View Post
Only the latest cite is from 1999. I think you missed the first cite given that indicates the pronunciation:

Totally agree on the comment about played out. That posting is from 2004.
We're both wrong. I was referring to Ben Zimmer's comment, which wasn't from 1993. But his comment wasn't from 1999 either; it was, as you said, from 2004.

But this whole thread contains people misunderstanding and talking past one another. The usage is certainly African-American. It doesn't sound anything at all like regional accents, whether they have a glottal stop or not. From the next message in that thread:
Quote:
just a warning... the spelling <di'nt> (or similar things) is often used to code a pronunciation in which the intervocalic voiced tap is simply deleted. not the same thing as a pronunciation with an intervocalic glottalish bit.
And as the examples just on this page show, it's both common and continues - albeit almost universally ironically - to this day.
#20
Old 05-05-2015, 09:37 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 39,815
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
Yeah, the silent "d" in "didn't" is pretty much standard American diction. Most people probably aren't aware that they aren't pronouncing the "d" in that word. It's not "dint", but "di - nt"
I have always heard the "d" pronounced . . . except that, as usual, the tongue isn't released before pronouncing the "n". It's subtly different from "di-nt".
#21
Old 05-05-2015, 11:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: up the coast
Posts: 4,417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post
We're both wrong. I was referring to Ben Zimmer's comment, which wasn't from 1993. But his comment wasn't from 1999 either; it was, as you said, from 2004.
Sorry, I realized I must have misunderstood what you were referring to; thanks for explaining that.

I had a more detailed post that got eaten, but I found examples from Martin(Martin Lawrence's character Shenehneh) and In Living Color (Jamie Foxx's Wanda) that both use the phrase with the meaning, but not the pronunciation.

Scrubs made reference to a 'minority sidekick in a bad movie' but she doesn't drop the d with any emphasis.

The particular pronunciation might well be traced to Rosie Perez or imitations of her. Even she uses it as an apparent catch phrase (or at least the recipient calls it a 'signature Rosie Perez "Oh no you didn't"')

Last edited by panamajack; 05-05-2015 at 11:32 PM.
#22
Old 05-06-2015, 03:03 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Worcestershire UK
Posts: 5,966
It's just lazy diction. When I was at school in the 50s we got pulled up for this: "There's a 't' in bu-a"; "There's no such word as aint". And that was almost exclusively white middle class English boys.
#23
Old 05-06-2015, 08:51 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: KCMO
Posts: 11,218
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob++ View Post
"There's no such word as aint".
Surely you realize this should be "There ain't no such word as ain't."

#24
Old 05-06-2015, 09:24 AM
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob++ View Post
It's just lazy diction.
Dropping certain letters is a feature of many if not most English dialects. Laziness has nothing to do with it.

Quote:
"There's a 't' in bu-a";
I'm not sure what word you are trying to indicate here.
#25
Old 05-06-2015, 10:10 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: La Rive Ouest
Posts: 9,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
Quote:
"There's a 't' in bu-a";
I'm not sure what word you are trying to indicate here.
I believe bob++ is from Great Britain, and is indicating something akin to a Cockney pronunciation of "butter".

.

Last edited by bordelond; 05-06-2015 at 10:11 AM. Reason: typos
#26
Old 05-06-2015, 10:15 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,520
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
I'm not sure what word you are trying to indicate here.
In some dialects, "butter" is pronounced "butta," and even the "tt" may be dropped -- "Pass me da BUH-uh."

Last edited by Cartoonacy; 05-06-2015 at 10:17 AM. Reason: Curses! NINJAED!
#27
Old 05-06-2015, 10:48 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: La Rive Ouest
Posts: 9,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by panamajack View Post
I had a more detailed post that got eaten, but I found examples from Martin(Martin Lawrence's character Shenehneh) and In Living Color (Jamie Foxx's Wanda) that both use the phrase with the meaning, but not the pronunciation.
Nice sleuthing

It should be noted - for the OP and for others unfamiliar with the catchphrase - that the pronunciation of "didn't" as "di'-'int!" is not the Ur-catchphrase. It's just a latter-day variation on a theme.

Some places that, today in 2015, you will sometimes hear the catchphrase as described in the OP is in cartoons. The typical Disney or Cartoon Network (CN) or Nickelodeon fare. For one specific example: I would bet money that the character Cyborg on Teen Titans Go! has uttered the phrase or something similar, as Cyborg sometimes adopts the sassy-black-woman personna as a comedic trope.
#28
Old 05-06-2015, 11:05 AM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 676
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
It's a common accent here in Schenectady -- a baby cat is a ki'in. And they'd say "I di'int go."

All the people I've heard it were either of Italian or Polish descent.
How do you pronounce "cotton"?

Do you say "kaht-tun", and sound like a pedant, or do you say "kah-un" like the rest of us do?
#29
Old 05-06-2015, 11:39 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 30,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by OffByOne View Post
How do you pronounce "cotton"?

Do you say "kaht-tun", and sound like a pedant, or do you say "kah-un" like the rest of us do?
As an Upstate New Yorker, I always put in the "t" sound. It would sound weird any other way, no matter how informal the conversation. Same for butter.
#30
Old 05-06-2015, 11:43 AM
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
I believe bob++ is from Great Britain, and is indicating something akin to a Cockney pronunciation of "butter".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cartoonacy View Post
In some dialects, "butter" is pronounced "butta," and even the "tt" may be dropped -- "Pass me da BUH-uh."
I figured it out after posting. The pronunciation would be similar in Bronxese, which shares some features like this with Cockney.

Dropping letters of course is not a sign of "laziness," although teachers may try to shame students into speaking more standard English by characterizing it that way. My mother, who has a strong Bronx accent, pronounces "oil burner" as "earl boinuh." Does adding an "r" make her industrious?
#31
Old 05-06-2015, 01:33 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: NY (Manhattan) NY USA
Posts: 19,775
So it's (the catchphrase thing, not the pronunciation thing) effectively like saying "No fucking way!".... ?
#32
Old 05-06-2015, 01:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Worcestershire UK
Posts: 5,966
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHunter3 View Post
So it's (the catchphrase thing, not the pronunciation thing) effectively like saying "No fucking way!".... ?
"No Fuck'n way"...
#33
Old 05-06-2015, 02:26 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,520
Quote:
Originally Posted by OffByOne View Post
How do you pronounce "cotton"?

Do you say "kaht-tun", and sound like a pedant, or do you say "kah-un" like the rest of us do?
Neither. I say "kaht-ən," pronouncing the T sound, but only in the first syllable.

(For comparison, I'm a downstate New Yorker.)

Last edited by Cartoonacy; 05-06-2015 at 02:27 PM.
#34
Old 05-06-2015, 02:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: La Rive Ouest
Posts: 9,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHunter3 View Post
So it's (the catchphrase thing, not the pronunciation thing) effectively like saying "No fucking way!".... ?
Sometimes it's used something like that -- but not to merely express incredulity about any and all non-specific things. "Oh, no she didn't!" is pretty much used only in response to a specific thing another person has said or done. The textbook usage (such as there is) would be in response to personal challenge of some sort.
A (to B and others present): "Michael said he's leaving you, and moving in with me! Girlfriend!"
B (to A and others present): "Oh, no she didn't!" ("No effing way" would work here, too, though with a different connotation).

A (to B with no one else present): "Lisa told me that Michael said he's leaving you, and moving in with her!"
B (to A with no one else present): "Oh, no she didn't!" ("No effing way" would work here, too, though with a different connotation).

A (to B): "Lisa just drove her new car off the lot, and she totalled it on the way home!"
B (to A): "No effing way!" ("Oh, no she didn't!" would NOT work here).
A literal meaning of "Oh, no she didn't!" might be "How dare she!", "Who does she think she is?", or "So she wants to start something with me that she knows she can't finish?!". In seedier circles, it can be a direct prelude to a physical confrontation ... something close to "Do you want to step outside?" between females.

Of course, it's usage in media these days (especially in cartoons) is much neutered. It's usually just used for comic effect and/or to convey "sassiness".
#35
Old 05-06-2015, 03:44 PM
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHunter3 View Post
So it's (the catchphrase thing, not the pronunciation thing) effectively like saying "No fucking way!".... ?
Yes. Typically it includes a finger wag, hand wave, head shake, and/or a finger snap, all indicating sassiness.

Last edited by Colibri; 05-06-2015 at 03:45 PM.
#36
Old 05-06-2015, 04:59 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 14,101
Go watch some episodes of The Bill Cosby Show from th '80s, you will hear the kids call Heathcliff Huxtable "da'", which ends with a sort of glottal stop. It seems like it was just the way they talked.

(And for me, cotton is a 1.5 syllable word that renders kind of like "KAHT'n.)
#37
Old 05-06-2015, 05:12 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: "Hicksville", Ark.
Posts: 34,227
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHunter3 View Post
So it's (the catchphrase thing, not the pronunciation thing) effectively like saying "No fucking way!".... ?
Not quite. The meaning is more literal than that, showing incredulity, disapproval, and often anger that "she" just "did" whatever it is that she just was described as (or seen as) doing.

It's more like "I can't believe she fucking did that!" said in an angry or at least disapproving tone.

The "she" can be replaced with "he," "they," or even possibly "you." And the disapproval can occasionally be a mock disapproval. You know, the kind where you're saying it's wrong but are actually admiring that they had the guts to do it.

Example:

"So Moesha just walked up to him and started making out with him."
"With Britney's boyfriend? Oh no she didn't!"

EDIT: or what bodeline said. I should have refreshed.

Last edited by BigT; 05-06-2015 at 05:16 PM.
#38
Old 05-06-2015, 05:25 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: "Hicksville", Ark.
Posts: 34,227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cartoonacy View Post
Neither. I say "kaht-ən," pronouncing the T sound, but only in the first syllable.

(For comparison, I'm a downstate New Yorker.)
Most people I know use both the unaspirated /t/ stop and a glottal to start a continual n. In quick speech, the glottal may be elided. I've only heard the /t/ stop be elided instead of the glottal in certain British or New England dialects.

IPA: [ˈkɒt˭(ʔ)nː] or [ˈkɑt˭t(ʔ)nː]
#39
Old 05-06-2015, 06:11 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,933
e-li-sion
#40
Old 05-06-2015, 06:45 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 30,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cartoonacy View Post
Neither. I say "kaht-ən," pronouncing the T sound, but only in the first syllable.

(For comparison, I'm a downstate New Yorker.)
Yep, first syllable "t".

Seriously, who says it without any "t" sound?

*Wish I was in the land of kah-un*

I don't care how thick your drawl is. Nobody talks that way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tapu View Post
e-li-sion
Shouldn't it be elis-ion? As in Elis in Wonderland?
#41
Old 05-06-2015, 07:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post

Shouldn't it be elis-ion? As in Elis in Wonderland?
No. I'd explain but people would just drift off.....
#42
Old 05-06-2015, 10:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 14,101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post
Shouldn't it be elis-ion? As in Elis in Wonderland?
It is the part of Hades where the good people go, the Elision Fields.
#43
Old 05-07-2015, 09:49 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: NY (Manhattan) NY USA
Posts: 19,775
Quote:
Originally Posted by tapu View Post
e-li-sion
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase
Shouldn't it be elis-ion? As in Elis in Wonderland?
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschereal
It is the part of Hades where the good people go, the Elision Fields.
Kyrie elision
Kyrie elision
... elision
Oh no she di'nt

Last edited by AHunter3; 05-07-2015 at 09:51 AM.
#44
Old 05-08-2015, 01:35 AM
Charter Member
Charter Member
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Not here. There.
Posts: 18,987
Quote:
Originally Posted by Son of a Rich View Post
I'm pop culture impaired. Where exactly did this come from?
Do you mean the pronunciation where the person still pronounces two syllables, but the second D is replaced by a glottal stop--i.e. a clear break in the "ih" sound, rather like "di-int"? Or does the person simply pronounce it like "dint"?

The first version is quite common in American English.

As for the second, "dint" version, that's typical kiddie speak which goes back at least to the time when I was a kiddie, sometime around 1965 or '66. I learned that it "didn't" not "dint", "regular" not "reglear", "ambulance" not "ambliance", etc. Strangely, I don't remember the teachers ever correcting me or anyone else on this point. For some reason I just "got it" suddenly as happened with others in my circle of friends and schoolmates. OTOH, I do remember teachers explaining how the notorious words "February" and "library" should be enunciated.
#45
Old 05-08-2015, 07:30 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 28,349
Elision is what happens when your pronunciation aim isn't true.
#46
Old 05-08-2015, 08:28 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 30,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
Elision is what happens when your pronunciation aim isn't true.
Little known fact. Elision Costello is Elvis Costello's birth name before he elided it.
#47
Old 05-08-2015, 11:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Barsoom
Posts: 4,023
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spectre of Pithecanthropus View Post
Do you mean the pronunciation where the person still pronounces two syllables, but the second D is replaced by a glottal stop--i.e. a clear break in the "ih" sound, rather like "di-int"? Or does the person simply pronounce it like "dint"?
No, I was wondering where the catchphrase/meme came from. I was certain it had a definite origin, but it appears I was mistaken.
#48
Old 05-08-2015, 11:35 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: La Rive Ouest
Posts: 9,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Son of a Rich View Post
No, I was wondering where the catchphrase/meme came from. I was certain it had a definite origin, but it appears I was mistaken.
It might not have an easily searchable singular origin, but I have no doubts the catchphrase was largely popularized on early '90s FOX television programming, such as Martin and In Living Color. Panamajack's research upthread pretty much confirms that for me.
#49
Old 05-08-2015, 01:26 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Des Plaines, IL (Chicago)
Posts: 1,948
Strictly MHO, but this sounds like Ricky Ricardo from I Love Lucy ("some 'splainin' to do") except I remember (or misremember) it as Ricky saying "Oh, no you di'nt!" to Lucy.

Last edited by John Bredin; 05-08-2015 at 01:27 PM.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:28 PM.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: [email protected]

Send comments about this website to:

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: lfm meaning weenis wikipedia open pet scan chris langan eddie bauer vs army marksmanship scores gay deciever arcade cup kandle heater casting csa print amazon receipt is 9mm bigger than .38 is semen water soluble derivative of 8e^x does getting a mole removed hurt 3.4 chevy engine problems where did shampoo come from diablo 2 lod burning essence of terror airbag injuries to face how to blackmail someone and get away with it car headrests too far forward can you wear your retainer after wisdom teeth removal chase credit access line can a dead man ejaculate