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#1
Old 09-22-2016, 11:24 PM
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Is it true that when you call an ambulance for someone, you have to pay for it? (need answer fast)

I am warning you in advance that this is going to sound stupid and frustrating, because it is.

My roommate is a guy I've known a long time, who I'm very close to, but he has certain issues. He is pretty sick; his breathing is kind of wheezy sounding, and he says he feels like he can't get enough air.

There is a hospital three blocks away. I told him hours ago that he should go to emergency and get checked out. (He has no job or income, but I'm just about certain that I signed him up for Obamacare a year or so ago.)

He won't go, and he won't say why. Perhaps he's holding out for me to offer to go with him, but I won't. He has literally zero patience, and is absolutely unable to wait anywhere for anything. He always ends up causing a scene and I just won't do it.

SO: If he really does have pneumonia or something and I end up having to call an ambulance, will I be liable for thousands of dollars? I hate to sound like a hardass, but my income is quite meager and I just don't know what to do.
#2
Old 09-22-2016, 11:26 PM
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The transported patient(s) pays for it.

Last edited by nearwildheaven; 09-22-2016 at 11:27 PM.
#3
Old 09-22-2016, 11:31 PM
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AFAIK the person who needs the medical assistance would get the bill. I've called 911 dozens of times in my life (no joke) and it never even occurred to me that I might get billed. A couple of times the ambulance showed up and made a decision not to transport the person, but still I never heard anything further. Certainly no bills.
#4
Old 09-22-2016, 11:32 PM
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Call 911. YOU don't pay for it.
The EMS crew can evaluate your roommate and your roommate can refuse transport if he wants .
#5
Old 09-22-2016, 11:35 PM
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Repeating what everybody else had said. In an emergency, the ambulance will transport a patient without regard to ability to pay. They will send a bill to the patient later.
#6
Old 09-22-2016, 11:46 PM
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Okay, thanks everyone. That is certainly a load off my mind.
#7
Old 09-23-2016, 12:06 AM
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Some communities have a volunteer ambulance service that will provide free or reduced fee services. Otherwise the amount that the patient pays would depend on health insurance coverage. We keep stickers with the number of our volunteer ambulance company on our phones. They don't have a webpage but here's another outfit that seems to operate in a similar way:
http://whitestoneambulance.com/

And an article about another volunteer ambulance corps
http://nydailynews.com/new-york/...ticle-1.172793

Last edited by gkster; 09-23-2016 at 12:09 AM.
#8
Old 09-23-2016, 12:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
The transported patient(s) pays for it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancia View Post
AFAIK the person who needs the medical assistance would get the bill. I've called 911 dozens of times in my life (no joke) and it never even occurred to me that I might get billed. A couple of times the ambulance showed up and made a decision not to transport the person, but still I never heard anything further. Certainly no bills.
I to have called 911 countless times. Of course the person that calls doesn't get billed for it, that wouldn't make sense. The person get transported...that's between them and their insurance. However, I believe (but could be wrong here) they don't get charged, at least not for a transport, at least not with city provided EMTs, if they decline to be transported. Again, for example, if I pass out and wake back up with EMTs standing over me, tell them I'm fine and they do a once over and walk out after declining, they really can't bill me for a service I didn't request. In the case where this happened last week, they didn't even know who (me) called them, no way they could bill me for it.

On the off chance it's being confused, calling 911 and requesting police help or having burglar alarms will typical get you a bill after X amount of false alarms.

Two questions for you:
1)Is your roommate willing to go to the hospital? If it's only three blocks, you could certainty drive him. Even Uber would be cheaper (hell, he could probably walk it if you went with him).
2)Again, if he's willing to go, it might be worth a call into his insurance company/ACA to see if it's cheaper to have 911 or a private transport company come and get him. Could be the difference between $300 and $1000.

Also, while 99% of the time they say 'why don't you come in', it might be worth checking out his insurance to see if they do video chat with a nurse. If not, at the very least, it you really think it's just phenomena, he could probably get away with urgent care, that's considerably cheaper, though they might not be thrilled with an ambulance pulling up.
#9
Old 09-23-2016, 12:32 AM
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An ambulance is not the only way to get to a hospital three blocks away, unless the patient requires special handling by trained staff to be moved safely, or life-saving emergency treatment en route. If you "think you have pneumonia", a taxi will cost five or ten bucks, against several thousand for an ambulance call. If the patient can walk to the curb, call a cab, or find a neighbor who will drive you.

Ambulances are very very very very expensive. You are not always doing someone a favor by calling an ambulance for someone. If they get in, they can face huge bills in the near future,, literally thousands of dollars.

Last edited by jtur88; 09-23-2016 at 12:35 AM.
#10
Old 09-23-2016, 12:39 AM
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One data point I personally witnessed 2 was ago at the bar....

A guy fell off his stool (not sure if by drunkeness or other reasons) and smacked his head pretty good. Bartender called 911 and emts showed up. After a quick q and a between tmem and the dude, they realized he was loopy and needed to go to the hospital. But he kept refusing to go. Utill the emt declared that it was illegal (in ca) for an emt to not transport a person deemed by said emt to need it. And refusal would force said emt to call the police.

Last edited by snfaulkner; 09-23-2016 at 12:40 AM.
#11
Old 09-23-2016, 12:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey P View Post
Also, while 99% of the time they say 'why don't you come in', it might be worth checking out his insurance to see if they do video chat with a nurse. If not, at the very least, it you really think it's just phenomena, he could probably get away with urgent care, that's considerably cheaper, though they might not be thrilled with an ambulance pulling up.
I don't think my insurance covers treatment for phenomena.

Last edited by cochrane; 09-23-2016 at 12:47 AM.
#12
Old 09-23-2016, 12:49 AM
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Since we're talking about breathing, though, and a guy who is apparently going to wait until he turns blue, ambulances have albuterol, epinephrine, and oxygen onboard. When our son was four and had an attack of croup, and was gasping for breath so hard that his face and chest were covered with petechiae. Anyway, the ambulance got there in like, two minutes, and thank goodness, because his pulse ox was 79%. They gave him inhaled steroids and oxygen, and got him up to 98% in about 60 seconds. If we'd tried to drive him to the hospital ourselves, the ten minutes it would have taken would mean 10 minutes of gasping, and a pulse ox of 79% or less.

So it's not just a matter of how fast the ambulance can get you there, but that the EMTs can treat you and stabilize you before transport.
#13
Old 09-23-2016, 01:01 AM
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I am sorry, but in which dystopian nightmare do people have to PAY for ambulances?

#14
Old 09-23-2016, 01:05 AM
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The United States. Land of the free to die because you can't pay for preventative care.
#15
Old 09-23-2016, 01:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava View Post
The United States. Land of the free to die because you can't pay for preventative care.
Canada too. At least in some provinces.

Last edited by Lord Feldon; 09-23-2016 at 01:45 AM.
#16
Old 09-23-2016, 01:59 AM
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Years ago, when I briefly worked as a bartender, a guy had an epileptic seizure in my bar. I was fucking 22 years old and didn't know what to do, so I called an ambulance, and they came and took him away. Next time I saw the guy, he was royally pissed off and in my face about calling an ambulance, and he had to pay for it.

Okay, fuck you, next time I'll just let you die on the floor (not).
#17
Old 09-23-2016, 02:26 AM
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Back at the beginning of the month, I thought kaylasmom might have pneumonia on the strength of her complaints of shortness of breath, and a rattling noise in her lungs.

I told this story in the mini-rants thread. Turned out to be congestive heart failure.

Is your roommate running a fever? Is he diabetic, or otherwise afflicted with a condition that may lead to coronary artery disease? You really ought to get him some medical attention, even if it's nothing more than an evaluation by some EMT's. He can't be compelled to ride the ambulance, as long as he's capable of communcating his wishes (whether he rides or not may have no bearing on whether he gets a bill, though).

In some communities, public utilities often offer, for a nominal monthly fee, a subscription to the fire department's paramedic services, that shield the consumer from a bill for FD paramedics' calls.
#18
Old 09-23-2016, 05:29 AM
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After a heart attack I was told my catheterization/stent would be done at a hospital 5 miles away. I wanted to get dressed and drive, but the cardiologist said that was nuts, they had an ambulance ready to take me.

I called my insurer and found out they would only cover ambulance transport done by the company near my home; 40 miles away, otherwise I'd be responsible for the bill.

I called the ambulance company and they came. I saved a big bill Using an ambulance that drove 40 miles each way to transport me rather than using one that was sitting right where I was.

Call his insurer
#19
Old 09-23-2016, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
I am sorry, but in which dystopian nightmare do people have to PAY for ambulances?

Ones where EMTs get a paycheck?
#20
Old 09-23-2016, 07:45 AM
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Agree with everyone else. But even if I were to think that I may get billed, I'd be concerned with the potential liability for not calling. Not only that, calling is the right thing to do.
#21
Old 09-23-2016, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by watchwolf49 View Post
Ones where EMTs get a paycheck?
So if you can't afford to pay, you just stay home and die of pneumonia?

Kneels down and kisses the floor of the NHS.
#22
Old 09-23-2016, 08:00 AM
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Just wanted to add, having gone to the hospital for asthma attacks a couple of times, that they take shortness of breath very seriously. There was mere minutes of wait time from triage nurse to being seen and treated by a doctor. Get your roommate to the hospital. Put him in a cab if you need to.
#23
Old 09-23-2016, 08:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey P;19647353On the off chance it's being confused, calling 911 and requesting [i
police[/i] help or having burglar alarms will typical get you a bill after X amount of false alarms.
Unless you call 911, usually repeatedly, for something you've been told not to call for, the caller will never face a bill or charges. If your neighbor's alarm goes off every day, they will get the bill, not you as the caller. Unless there's something else going on, like it's really the quitting whistle at the local plant & you call every day at 5 o'clock.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Ambulances are very very very very expensive. You are not always doing someone a favor by calling an ambulance for someone. If they get in, they can face huge bills in the near future,, literally thousands of dollars.
I'd say $1000 - $1500, not thousand(s), plural, but yeah, it ain't cheap.



Quote:
Originally Posted by snfaulkner View Post
One data point I personally witnessed 2 was ago at the bar....

A guy fell off his stool (not sure if by drunkeness or other reasons) and smacked his head pretty good. Bartender called 911 and emts showed up. After a quick q and a between tmem and the dude, they realized he was loopy and needed to go to the hospital. But he kept refusing to go. Utill the emt declared that it was illegal (in ca) for an emt to not transport a person deemed by said emt to need it. And refusal would force said emt to call the police.
This is kind of a unique case. Is he loopy because he's normally loopy, because he's drunk, or because he's got a head injury. A drunk person is usually not considered of sound mind & therefore, can't refuse treatment.
#24
Old 09-23-2016, 08:10 AM
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Originally Posted by watchwolf49 View Post
Ones where EMTs get a paycheck?
What? You don't have taxes which pay for Ambulance service, either government owned or contracted out?
#25
Old 09-23-2016, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by SanVito View Post
So if you can't afford to pay, you just stay home and die of pneumonia?

Kneels down and kisses the floor of the NHS.
They don't swipe your credit card before putting you in, for crying out loud. The first priority is saving your life, payment is something sorted out later.

People who can't afford to pay presumably can have a payment plan or a discount thanks to government subsidies. Despite how much certain people villainize American health care, there are many safety nets for people in need. I've been dirt poor in the past and benefited from them, especially the first time I had kidney stones.

With all that said, some ambulance companies seem to completely gouge people, reportedly charging you more than $1,000 for just showing up, checking your vitals, and then leaving without taking you anywhere.
#26
Old 09-23-2016, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
What? You don't have taxes which pay for Ambulance service, either government owned or contracted out?
Some areas do, but most ambulance services are private for-profit companies in the US.
#27
Old 09-23-2016, 08:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanVito View Post
So if you can't afford to pay, you just stay home and die of pneumonia?

Kneels down and kisses the floor of the NHS.
Oh no, you call, you get the lifesaving help you need, and then you go bankrupt. Duh.
#28
Old 09-23-2016, 08:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snfaulkner View Post
... But he kept refusing to go. Utill the emt declared that it was illegal (in ca) for an emt to not transport a person deemed by said emt to need it. And refusal would force said emt to call the police.
OP spin-off coming.
#29
Old 09-23-2016, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Atamasama View Post
People who can't afford to pay presumably can have a payment plan or a discount thanks to government subsidies. Despite how much certain people villainize American health care, there are many safety nets for people in need. I've been dirt poor in the past and benefited from them, especially the first time I had kidney stones.
This is true.

Many Dopers would shriek in horror at this ... but for people that aren't dirt poor, but also can't pull medical-bill money out of their sofa cushions: it's not unknown for people to simply ignore some medical bills. Very occasionally, the medical establishment will drop the matter and not even take it to collections or anything like that.

Such actions may or may not hurt one's credit score eventually. The medical establishments have a lot of leeway on what and when to report to credit companies. On the part of most patients who do this, one hopes it's not done cynically, but out of a truly perceived need. It ain't pretty, but it happens.
#30
Old 09-23-2016, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by brainstall View Post
Just wanted to add, having gone to the hospital for asthma attacks a couple of times, that they take shortness of breath very seriously. There was mere minutes of wait time from triage nurse to being seen and treated by a doctor. Get your roommate to the hospital. Put him in a cab if you need to.
Yeah, one time when I walked into Northwestern's ER in Chicago with wheezing/gasping I didn't even get my first sentence to the triage nurse finished before two big guys bodily picked me up and put me on a gurney. I got the usual interrogation and insurance and stuff AFTER I could breathe normally again.

If you show up at an ER with breathing problems you usually get immediate attention.
#31
Old 09-23-2016, 09:40 AM
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We had volunteer fire and EMS for decades, there was no charge for their services to anyone. Then people started abusing the system and would call 911 for an ambulance ride, get a ride to the nearest hospital ER 40 miles away, then walk away. So unfortunately a few bad apples ruined it for everyone.
#32
Old 09-23-2016, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Nava View Post
The United States. Land of the free to die because you can't pay for preventative care.
Moderator Note

Let's refrain from political jabs in General Questions. No warning issued.

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#33
Old 09-23-2016, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by brujaja View Post
He won't go, and he won't say why. Perhaps he's holding out for me to offer to go with him, but I won't. He has literally zero patience, and is absolutely unable to wait anywhere for anything. He always ends up causing a scene and I just won't do it.
Drop him at the door, tell him you are going to park the car. Park the car back at your apartment. Don't answer calls from him for a few hours, so you know there is at least a chance he has been seen.

Last edited by Folacin; 09-23-2016 at 10:38 AM.
#34
Old 09-23-2016, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Lord Feldon View Post
Canada too. At least in some provinces.
Last ambulance ride I had (a couple of years ago) was about C$300 in Alberta. However the very minimal supplementary health insurance I have covered it except for the $50 yearly deductible. (As I've said in the past, UHC covers everyone, not everything, so supplementary health insurance does make sense up here).
#35
Old 09-23-2016, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
Years ago, when I briefly worked as a bartender, a guy had an epileptic seizure in my bar. I was fucking 22 years old and didn't know what to do, so I called an ambulance, and they came and took him away. Next time I saw the guy, he was royally pissed off and in my face about calling an ambulance, and he had to pay for it.

Okay, fuck you, next time I'll just let you die on the floor (not).
A seizure, while scary, rarely requires emergency care. Most of the time there's little they can do. Many of us with epilepsy have ended up with huge hospital bills by well-meaning but uninformed bystanders. Perhaps the guy should have been a little more polite, but having been in his shoes, I can sympathize.

For future reference, the best thing is lower a person to the floor and turn them on their side, with their head slightly elevated. Make sure there's nothing near by they can hurt themselves on, and time the seizure. If it lasts any longer than what, three minutes (I believe), THEN you should call for help. And finally, NEVER your hand, or anything else (a wallet, a spoon, etc) in someone's mouth if they're seizing. Not unless you want to get bitten. (My mother found that out the hard way!) They're not going to swallow their tongue.
#36
Old 09-23-2016, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
The transported patient(s) pays for it.
Yeah, I got woozy one time after getting dehydrated and overheated, and someone called an ambulance for me, and I was on the hook for that and the subsequent ER visit, even though I didn't really want either one.
#37
Old 09-23-2016, 05:38 PM
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Originally Posted by brujaja View Post
I am warning you in advance that this is going to sound stupid and frustrating, because it is.

My roommate is a guy I've known a long time, who I'm very close to, but he has certain issues. He is pretty sick; his breathing is kind of wheezy sounding, and he says he feels like he can't get enough air.

There is a hospital three blocks away. I told him hours ago that he should go to emergency and get checked out. (He has no job or income, but I'm just about certain that I signed him up for Obamacare a year or so ago.)

He won't go, and he won't say why. Perhaps he's holding out for me to offer to go with him, but I won't. He has literally zero patience, and is absolutely unable to wait anywhere for anything. He always ends up causing a scene and I just won't do it.

SO: If he really does have pneumonia or something and I end up having to call an ambulance, will I be liable for thousands of dollars? I hate to sound like a hardass, but my income is quite meager and I just don't know what to do.
Ambulances are not a taxi service, don't waste their time when you could just as well get a real taxi. That way they will be available to help someone who actually needs urgent care instead of wasting their time on someone who is just too stubborn to go to the hospital themselves.
#38
Old 09-23-2016, 05:38 PM
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Being British, I find it unfathomable how it works in North America, but even so, I would assume that if you couldn't afford to foot the bill.. you could either wing it down to something like $5 per month, or not pay and it would be a civil matter and not criminal (akin to credit card or loan debt)?
#39
Old 09-23-2016, 05:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guitario View Post
Being British, I find it unfathomable how it works in North America, but even so, I would assume that if you couldn't afford to foot the bill.. you could either wing it down to something like $5 per month, or not pay and it would be a civil matter and not criminal (akin to credit card or loan debt)?


It's not a criminal matter, but people routinely go bankrupt over emergency medical bills.
#40
Old 09-23-2016, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
I am sorry, but in which dystopian nightmare do people have to PAY for ambulances?

Australia.
#41
Old 09-23-2016, 06:21 PM
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An ambulance 'ride' is two grand in the US, so avoid it if you can.

The patient (or their insurance) gets the bill.
#42
Old 09-23-2016, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Wesley Clark View Post
An ambulance 'ride' is two grand in the US, so avoid it if you can.

The patient (or their insurance) gets the bill.
Yep. Just one of the two to four bills you get for an ER visit via ambulance. That, the bill from the hospital, maybe an additional bill from the diagnosing doc depending on her status with the hospital, a bill from the treating doc if different from the first doc. Then pay for a ride home via taxi if you're on your own. Or get admitted and then see some serious billing.
#43
Old 09-23-2016, 06:52 PM
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Ambulance companies have independent contracts with hospitals. Their bills in general go through the hospital, so the person receiving treatment is the person who will also get the bill for the Ambulance, helicopter, or fire department that assisted them.

The only time you would be liable for the bill would be under the premise of a false call. So if you called an ambulance for your neighbor who didn't request one, you could be on the hook for the bill.
#44
Old 09-23-2016, 06:59 PM
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I wish the OP would come back and tell us what happened.
#45
Old 09-23-2016, 07:00 PM
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OP hasn't been back since yesterday. Hope everything with roomie is OK. Hope he got piled into a cab instead of an ambulance. Or got a ride another way. If he couldn't make the 3 block walk there, then once there he likely wouldn't leave until being seen, since he wouldn't be able to walk home anyway.

Good rule of thumb - if you have time to ask about it on a message board, it's probably not an ambulance worthy emergency.
#46
Old 09-23-2016, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaDragonTattoo View Post

::: snip ::::

Good rule of thumb - if you have time to ask about it on a message board, it's probably not an ambulance worthy emergency.
↑↑↑ This + the OP sounded more like an "Odd Couple" fight to me than an emergency. It was about him feeling bad in the future because of an idiot roommate IMO.
#47
Old 09-23-2016, 08:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
Years ago, when I briefly worked as a bartender, a guy had an epileptic seizure in my bar. I was fucking 22 years old and didn't know what to do, so I called an ambulance, and they came and took him away. Next time I saw the guy, he was royally pissed off and in my face about calling an ambulance, and he had to pay for it.

Okay, fuck you, next time I'll just let you die on the floor (not).
I worked with disabled people, and we had a few people who were epileptic as a comorbidity with other problems. Seizures are not 911 events unless the person falls and hits their head and is bleeding from the mouth or nose. I had a lot of headaches dealing with ambulance services trying to get bills waived for people on very limited incomes who never should have been transported.

Now, if this is someone you know, who is NOT a diagnosed epileptic, and has never had a seizure before, you might want to think about going to the hospital, and 911 may be a good idea if the seizure goes on for a long time, or the person is completely disoriented afterwards.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brainstall View Post
Just wanted to add, having gone to the hospital for asthma attacks a couple of times, that they take shortness of breath very seriously. There was mere minutes of wait time from triage nurse to being seen and treated by a doctor. Get your roommate to the hospital. Put him in a cab if you need to.
They take even something that is a precursor to interrupted breathing seriously. I had an allergic reaction to a medication once that made my face puff up a little. I was having no trouble breathing at all, but I never got taken back so fast, and that includes the time I was 11 weeks pregnant and having abdominal pains (which turned out to be mild food poisoning, and everything was fine, but geez-- course, it was one of the lowest-rated ERs in the country).

I had sort of the opposite situation come up with an ambulance once. In the US, you can get stuck with 100% of a medical bill for refusing medical services Against Medical Advice (AMA), which means that, for example, if you go to the ER, and the doctor wants to keep you overnight, but you insist on leaving, you can get billed for the whole ER visit, even if you have insurance.

Well, I was in a car accident, and unconscious when the ambulance was called. The EMTs wanted to transport me because they thought my ankle might be broken (it wasn't). I was advised to go, because my insurance covered ambulance transport, but if I refused the EMTs advice, I might get stuck with a bill for the whole run plus the EMTs exam. I was actually cool with being transported, but it was some standard disclaimer they had to read me, I guess.
#48
Old 09-23-2016, 11:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RivkahChaya View Post
I had sort of the opposite situation come up with an ambulance once. In the US, you can get stuck with 100% of a medical bill for refusing medical services Against Medical Advice (AMA), which means that, for example, if you go to the ER, and the doctor wants to keep you overnight, but you insist on leaving, you can get billed for the whole ER visit, even if you have insurance.
My understanding is that this is widely believed by doctors and nurses, but is not true.
#49
Old 09-23-2016, 11:33 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ENugent View Post
My understanding is that this is widely believed by doctors and nurses, but is not true.
I think it depends on your carrier, and I checked with my carrier, and it was something that they could, in fact, do (or, I suppose, not do, but probably any excuse to deny a claim...). I could contest it, but I didn't intend not to comply anyway.

It gets sticky because they don't want you to leave when the doctor wants to do an ultrasound to check for an inflamed appendix, and you leave because you don't want an appendectomy, then you return three days later with a burst appendix and peritonitis that requires a week-long stay and IV antibiotics, when the appendectomy would have been a one-day stay.

So, I think what happens is, if you protest, they'll review the case, and if it looks like your decision to leave ultimately cost more money, you are SOL-- or at least on the hook for whatever the estimate of the extra your bad decision cost.

Like I said, not all carriers may have this policy, though. My carrier at the time did. On the whole, it was pretty good (especially, it never charged more than $16 for a brand name drug if a generic was not available, which was a pretty rare thing-- I knew people with $60 copays for brand name drugs that weren't available in generic), so I guess you get good coverage by putting up with them cutting corners in other places.
#50
Old 09-23-2016, 11:48 PM
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Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 3,734
Quote:
Originally Posted by RivkahChaya View Post
So, I think what happens is, if you protest, they'll review the case, and if it looks like your decision to leave ultimately cost more money, you are SOL-- or at least on the hook for whatever the estimate of the extra your bad decision cost.
If you follow my link, you'll see that it was not true for any of the 526 patients who left an Illinois hospital AMA during 2001-2010. When and where did your story occur, and why do you think that your insurance would have denied the claim? Did a doctor tell you that they would, or was it someone at the insurance company? What company was it?
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