Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 05-17-2018, 08:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CentralArkansas
Posts: 23,426
Cheap Electrical Receptacles have hymens now? Awesome

Replaced several worn out electrical receptacles for a friend. He had bought a bag of the cheap 50 cent ones from HD. I normally would buy the boxed levitons fot $2.

Plugged in his clock radio with some difficultly. Had to pop the cherry first. Wanted a cigarette afterwards.

No joke. There's a micro thin film of plastic over the opening. The plug's hard prong has to punch through it the first time the Receptacle is used.

Next time you're in HD, look at the bargin bin cheap Receptacles. Every one has left over plastic covering the slots. I assume Lowes bargin priced are similar.

It's just these cheap ones. The boxed levitons have clear slots. Superior manufacturing process.

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-17-2018 at 08:27 PM.
#2
Old 05-17-2018, 09:38 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 1,198
It has nothing to do with inferior manufacturing processes. The outlets you are referring to are tamper-resistant outlets. The plastic pieces you are referring to are shutters to prevent children from inserting fingers or other objects. The shutters open when a plug is inserted and close when the plug is removed. Both tamper-resistant and non-tamper resistant are available, and code requires the tamper-resistant version to be used in new construction.

Last edited by Cleophus; 05-17-2018 at 09:39 PM.
#3
Old 05-17-2018, 09:48 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CentralArkansas
Posts: 23,426
It felt like the prong broke through the plastic.

I unplugged it several times. Then the clock radio plugged in easily. I only plugged in a couple appliances. The other receptacles will have to be punched through whenever needed.

They probably are tamper resistant. Yet more Nanny State nonsense.

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-17-2018 at 09:50 PM.
#4
Old 05-17-2018, 09:59 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Riding my handcycle
Posts: 34,414
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
It felt like the prong broke through the plastic.

I unplugged it several times. Then the clock radio plugged in easily. I only plugged in a couple appliances. The other receptacles will have to be punched through whenever needed.

They probably are tamper resistant. Yet more Nanny State nonsense.
There's generally a reason when those sorts of things get mandated. Like kids getting electrocuted.
#5
Old 05-17-2018, 10:04 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2015
Location: 123 Fake Street
Posts: 5,989
Seems like a good place to post this.
#6
Old 05-17-2018, 10:20 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 23,782
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
They probably are tamper resistant. Yet more Nanny State nonsense.
TR receptacles have been proven to significantly reduce serious injuries to toddlers and adults. They also prevent accidents caused by objects coming into contact with old or damaged receptacles, which protects everybody. They cost one quarter more than non-TR receptacles. (Sorry, in aceplace-ease, that's "two bits.") And they're not even required for every outlet (just those near the floor.)

There's nanny-statism, and there's practical, evidence-based approaches to improving building safety. I'll let you struggle with determining which things are which.
#7
Old 05-17-2018, 10:21 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 27,183
Quote:
Originally Posted by snfaulkner View Post
Seems like a good place to post this.
Or this.
#8
Old 05-17-2018, 10:56 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Fenario
Posts: 1,171
Quote:
Replaced several worn out electrical receptacles for a friend.
Friend, eh?

Quote:
Next time you're in HD, look at the bargin bin cheap Receptacles. Every one has left over plastic covering the slots. I assume Lowes bargin priced are similar.
Oh, I'll look at them alright...I'll have to wear my stoutest pair of canvas overalls to ensure that my arousal over the "hymens" doesn't poke an innocent bystander's eyes out.
#9
Old 05-18-2018, 01:37 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: San Francisco area
Posts: 16,156
I understand the rationale behind TR receptacles, but I have no children and I hate the TR receptacles that infest my house. The first couple of uses are difficult, usually requiring more fiddling and futzing than one would think reasonable to "pop the cherry" and get a usable receptacle.
#10
Old 05-18-2018, 01:44 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 23,782
You can replace them if you want. Nobody's gonna snitch.
#11
Old 05-18-2018, 07:04 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Riding my handcycle
Posts: 34,414
Quote:
Originally Posted by friedo View Post
You can replace them if you want. Nobody's gonna snitch.
Better check the building codes first.
#12
Old 05-18-2018, 07:31 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: On the level, if inclined
Posts: 13,979
Initial use of the outlets can be tricky, and it really is best if you can set aside the natural desire to just force the plug into a brand new outlet as this can damage both outlet and plug. I good technique is to slowly wiggle the plug up and down in the slots as you gradually work the plug in. The application of a little dielectric grease will facilitate the process with the added bonus of more harmonious electrical flow and less resistance at the union. A little wine and flowers beforehand doesn't hurt either.
__________________
Y'all are just too damned serious. Lighten up.
#13
Old 05-18-2018, 08:17 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: South Bay
Posts: 83,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleophus View Post
It has nothing to do with inferior manufacturing processes. The outlets you are referring to are tamper-resistant outlets. The plastic pieces you are referring to are shutters to prevent children from inserting fingers or other objects. The shutters open when a plug is inserted and close when the plug is removed. Both tamper-resistant and non-tamper resistant are available, and code requires the tamper-resistant version to be used in new construction.
I don't know about the rest of the country, but the building code in CA requires those outlets.
#14
Old 05-18-2018, 08:39 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Dayton OH USA
Posts: 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inigo Montoya View Post
Initial use of the outlets can be tricky, and it really is best if you can set aside the natural desire to just force the plug into a brand new outlet as this can damage both outlet and plug. I good technique is to slowly wiggle the plug up and down in the slots as you gradually work the plug in. The application of a little dielectric grease will facilitate the process with the added bonus of more harmonious electrical flow and less resistance at the union. A little wine and flowers beforehand doesn't hurt either.
I don't know what surprises me most about this thread - that it became arousing, or that the OP knew what a hymen was.
#15
Old 05-18-2018, 08:44 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Ohio
Posts: 10,681
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
He had bought a bag of the cheap 50 cent ones from HD. I normally would buy the boxed levitons for $2.
When I am buying receptacles, I make it a point to never buy the cheap ones. A couple reasons:

1) The cheap ones usually require the copper wire to be wrapped under the screw head. I much prefer the (more expensive) receptacles where you push the straight copper wire into a hole and then tighten the screw.

2) The cheap ones seem to have a lower spring force compared to the more expensive ones.
#16
Old 05-18-2018, 08:46 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,938
I hate those things. We just had our kitchen redone and the contractor installed them even though they are way up high behind a counter.
#17
Old 05-18-2018, 09:17 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: South Bay
Posts: 83,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermitian View Post
I hate those things. We just had our kitchen redone and the contractor installed them even though they are way up high behind a counter.
You might check the building code in your area. As I noted earlier, they are required in CA. It may be that the contractor wanted to make sure you'd pass the Final Inspection, or it may be that those are the only type that are sold these days. The building code (at lest in CA) has gotten very stringent in the last few years. There are all sort of safety, water conservation and energy conservation requirements that contractors have to comply with.
#18
Old 05-18-2018, 10:14 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 11,188
So if you have to punch through, doesn't that thin layer of plastic then potentially linger inside the socket itself and hamper the electricity conduction?
#19
Old 05-18-2018, 10:19 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,701
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post

They probably are tamper resistant. Yet more Nanny State nonsense.
The whole receptacle requirement is nanny state, just having 2 bare wires sticking out of the wall work perfectly fine, no need for the box either.
#20
Old 05-18-2018, 10:33 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: On the level, if inclined
Posts: 13,979
Indeed. Why, when I was a boy we only had the two wires sticking out of the wall, no insulation on them, and someone had to hold them in place on the plug.
__________________
Y'all are just too damned serious. Lighten up.
#21
Old 05-18-2018, 10:41 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 43,953
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
So if you have to punch through, doesn't that thin layer of plastic then potentially linger inside the socket itself and hamper the electricity conduction?
If these are the kind I'm thinking of, you don't "break" anything. You push, the shutters move out of the way when there's pressure on both sides, and the plug slides in. See here for a video.
#22
Old 05-18-2018, 11:07 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Southern Ontario
Posts: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by friedo View Post
TR receptacles have been proven to significantly reduce serious injuries to toddlers and adults. They also prevent accidents caused by objects coming into contact with old or damaged receptacles, which protects everybody. They cost one quarter more than non-TR receptacles. (Sorry, in aceplace-ease, that's "two bits.") And they're not even required for every outlet (just those near the floor.)

There's nanny-statism, and there's practical, evidence-based approaches to improving building safety. I'll let you struggle with determining which things are which.
No struggle at all, nanny-stateism through and through.
#23
Old 05-18-2018, 11:33 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CentralArkansas
Posts: 23,426
Tamper resistant receptacles are a good choice and should be on the market. I don't think it's necessary to make them mandatory by code.

Homes were wired in the 1930's,40's. Baby boomers, their children, and their grandchildren have managrd to live in those homes safely.

Kids sticking bobby pins in outlets isn't all that common. I know it happens and I'm glad there's after market products available that parents can purchase inexpensively.

I bought something like this 20 years ago when my kids were born. Took less than 30 mins to child proof the empty receptacles in the entire house.
https://amazon.com/Safety-1st-De...?tag=bbprfg-20

Many receptacles are behind furniture and not accessible to children. Yet, code would require their use any way. It's not fun fumbling behind a couch to plug in a lamp. Tamper resistant just makes it even harder.

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-18-2018 at 11:37 AM.
#24
Old 05-18-2018, 11:52 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CentralArkansas
Posts: 23,426
Btw, jokes about electrical plugs and receptacles have been around long before I was born.

I like this one. Safe for work
https://goo.gl/images/6bJDvf

Pretty cute
https://cartoonstock.com/cartoon...atref=dren1012

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-18-2018 at 11:55 AM.
#25
Old 05-18-2018, 12:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: On the level, if inclined
Posts: 13,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
Btw, jokes about electrical plugs and receptacles have been around long before I was born.
My personal favorite.
#26
Old 05-18-2018, 12:43 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Again, Titletown
Posts: 20,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
Homes were wired in the 1930's,40's. Baby boomers, their children, and their grandchildren have managrd to live in those homes safely.
Except for the ones that died, sure.
#27
Old 05-18-2018, 12:54 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: On the level, if inclined
Posts: 13,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Except for the ones that died, sure.
You misspelled "the ones who had sense enough to not fiddle with electrical outlets." Darwin, luck, etc.
__________________
Y'all are just too damned serious. Lighten up.
#28
Old 05-18-2018, 01:01 PM
Isaiah 1:15 Screw the NRA.
Charter Member
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 49,215
Because 2 year olds are such models of constraint and safety.
#29
Old 05-18-2018, 01:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CentralArkansas
Posts: 23,426
Which is why I specifically pointed out inexpensive child safety caps for receptacles and used them in my own home.

No one here is suggesting safety in the home isn't important.

We don't need the Nanny State to tell us that.

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-18-2018 at 01:11 PM.
#30
Old 05-18-2018, 01:14 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 43,953
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inigo Montoya View Post
You misspelled "the ones who had sense enough to not fiddle with electrical outlets." Darwin, luck, etc.
Call it luck. I'm no fucking idiot, but as a kid, I stuck shit in the electrical outlet and got zapped a few times. I guess I eventually figured out not to do that, but how in the shit was I supposed to know the first time or two that sticking conductive materials into an electrical receptacle is a bad idea? Eventually, I figured it out through trial and error I guess, but what is this "sense" when you're four or five years old and have no idea how the world works?

My brother wasn't quite as lucky, although he survived, when he stuck something into an outlet and ended up with a trip to the ER and a giant electrical burn down his hand, maybe six inches long or so. Luckily, I was in the room with him and managed to somehow drag him from outlet without getting zapped myself (or perhaps he had already broken the connection), but it wasn't pretty. He was probably about 3 at the time, and I would have been 9 or 10.

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-18-2018 at 01:18 PM.
#31
Old 05-18-2018, 01:20 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: On the level, if inclined
Posts: 13,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Because 2 year olds are such models of constraint and safety.
Well not anymore. The dim ones have reproduced!
__________________
Y'all are just too damned serious. Lighten up.
#32
Old 05-18-2018, 01:48 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NRW, Germany
Posts: 2,173
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
Which is why I specifically pointed out inexpensive child safety caps for receptacles and used them in my own home.

No one here is suggesting safety in the home isn't important.

We don't need the Nanny State to tell us that.
If you are a professional in electrics, you should well know that safety standards are enforced for good reasons (which can be matters of life or death) and that you can get in hot water if you don't apply them.

If you're not, you had no business installing those receptacles in the first place.

(at least by the laws in my neck of the woods)
__________________
And if my thought-dreams could be seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine
#33
Old 05-18-2018, 01:51 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Again, Titletown
Posts: 20,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
No one here is suggesting safety in the home isn't important.

We don't need the Nanny State to tell us that.
Apparently we do. Any other bits of building codes you'd like to do away with?
#34
Old 05-18-2018, 02:19 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 20,101
What did the electrician say when his daughter came home at 2:00 am?

"Wire you insulate?"
#35
Old 05-18-2018, 02:35 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 23,782
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
Which is why I specifically pointed out inexpensive child safety caps for receptacles and used them in my own home.
You mean the caps that, in a study conducted by the NFPA, 100% of toddlers were able to remove in 10 seconds?
#36
Old 05-18-2018, 04:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by friedo View Post
You mean the caps that, in a study conducted by the NFPA, 100% of toddlers were able to remove in 10 seconds?
I don't really have a dog in this fight, but I do have to point out it says "100% of all 2-4 year olds were able to remove one type of plastic outlet cap within 10 seconds" (Bolding mine).

I know that toddlers can't get mine off easily, because they end up being so stinking tight that it takes me a long time to get them off (mostly because I end up having to get a flat head screwdriver!).
#37
Old 05-18-2018, 05:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: PA
Posts: 190
I recently bought an outlet at Home Depot. It had a piece of actual clear plastic over the two plug openings. Are you sure there isn't a piece of plastic with holes in it there now?
#38
Old 05-18-2018, 05:40 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NRW, Germany
Posts: 2,173
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdhenry View Post
I recently bought an outlet at Home Depot. It had a piece of actual clear plastic over the two plug openings. Are you sure there isn't a piece of plastic with holes in it there now?
Just like a hymen, you mean?
__________________
And if my thought-dreams could be seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine
#39
Old Yesterday, 02:52 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 5,906
Quote:
Originally Posted by EinsteinsHund View Post
Just like a hymen, you mean?
They're making hymens out of plastic these days?
#40
Old Yesterday, 05:28 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 29,021
And the penny drops...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleophus View Post
It has nothing to do with inferior manufacturing processes. The outlets you are referring to are tamper-resistant outlets. The plastic pieces you are referring to are shutters to prevent children from inserting fingers or other objects. The shutters open when a plug is inserted and close when the plug is removed. Both tamper-resistant and non-tamper resistant are available, and code requires the tamper-resistant version to be used in new construction.
So THAT’S why when we shifted sixty feet eastward to a remodeled unit in December of 2016 several wall outlets just Would. Not. Accept. the devices I tried to plug in. Cheap tamper-resistant outlets.

Got the handyman to fix them.
#41
Old Yesterday, 09:00 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: KS, US
Posts: 5,752
Quote:
Originally Posted by commasense View Post
They're making hymens out of plastic these days?
Won't someone think of the ocean?!
#42
Old Yesterday, 11:44 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 9,057
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
[...]

Homes were wired in the 1930's,40's. Baby boomers, their children, and their grandchildren have managrd to live in those homes safely.

[...]

Well, now, wait a minute. Seat belts and air bags, polio vaccine, helmets for bicyclists, 911, grounding pins, EMTs, disposable medical supplies, safety goggles, unleaded gasoline, unleaded paint, and a whole bunch of other new things have come along since we boomers were little. These things make us safer. Those of us who didn't happen to perish because of the problems these fixed were still living less safely, just being fortunate while doing so. I think it's great if we keep eliminating the more dangerous elements of typical life.
#43
Old Yesterday, 11:51 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: South Bay
Posts: 83,015
Great children books that have never been written: Why Can't Mr. Knife and Mr. Electrical Outlet Be Friends?

Last edited by John Mace; Yesterday at 11:51 AM.
#44
Old Yesterday, 02:00 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CentralArkansas
Posts: 23,426
You get what you pay for. A 50 cent receptacle isn't as well made as a $2 item.

HD and Lowes are absolutely making a killing on electrical parts.

A single gang, old work box is over $3 each. I know because I recently bought several for a project.

I'd estimate, Electricians buy a bulk pack of 50 for probably $50. (not from big box stores!)

Wire is even worse. HD stuck me $23 for a 25ft roll of 12/2 with ground. I should have at least bought a hundred ft at a better price.

I don't even want to know what electricians pay for 500ft rolls. I'd guess less than 50 cents a foot.
Copper is ridiculously high these days, but there's still a good discount at wholesale, bulk pricing.

Last edited by aceplace57; Yesterday at 02:05 PM.
#45
Old Yesterday, 06:52 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
Btw, jokes about electrical plugs and receptacles have been around long before I was born.

I like this one. Safe for work
https://goo.gl/images/6bJDvf

Pretty cute
https://cartoonstock.com/cartoon...atref=dren1012
Safe for work you say? My goodness, their male and female parts are clearly visible!
#46
Old Yesterday, 09:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Up nort'
Posts: 1,798
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
You get what you pay for. A 50 cent receptacle isn't as well made as a $2 item.

HD and Lowes are absolutely making a killing on electrical parts.

A single gang, old work box is over $3 each. I know because I recently bought several for a project.

I'd estimate, Electricians buy a bulk pack of 50 for probably $50. (not from big box stores!)

Wire is even worse. HD stuck me $23 for a 25ft roll of 12/2 with ground. I should have at least bought a hundred ft at a better price.

I don't even want to know what electricians pay for 500ft rolls. I'd guess less than 50 cents a foot.
Copper is ridiculously high these days, but there's still a good discount at wholesale, bulk pricing.
Now you confused me. The bulk pack of 50 cent receptacles your buddy bought in bulk are not as good as the $2 individual one yet the electrician's 50 cents a foot wire is better than the $1 / foot stuff you can get? BTW Amazon for wire
#47
Old Today, 01:11 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
You get what you pay for. A 50 cent receptacle isn't as well made as a $2 item.
This is not always true. As a handyman I shop at HD at least 4x a week. Through the years I've noticed some items (electrical ones in particular) are packaged differently but are exactly the same part - right down to manufacturers numbers and markings - that sell for dollars more.
Quote:
HD and Lowes are absolutely making a killing on electrical parts.

A single gang, old work box is over $3 each. I know because I recently bought several for a project.

I'd estimate, Electricians buy a bulk pack of 50 for probably $50. (not from big box stores!)

Wire is even worse. HD stuck me $23 for a 25ft roll of 12/2 with ground. I should have at least bought a hundred ft at a better price.

I don't even want to know what electricians pay for 500ft rolls. I'd guess less than 50 cents a foot.
Copper is ridiculously high these days, but there's still a good discount at wholesale, bulk pricing.
Then why in the hell do you still shop there?
#48
Old Today, 02:33 AM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 38,009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermitian View Post
I hate those things. We just had our kitchen redone and the contractor installed them even though they are way up high behind a counter.
I remember when I discovered honey.

Shortly after, I discovered how to climb kitchen furniture. It's all Mom's fault, for putting the pot of golden sweetness on top of the high cupboards.
__________________
Life ain't peaches and cream, but sometimes it's laughing your ass off when you have no ass. - WhyNot
#49
Old Today, 06:40 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Where the wild roses grow
Posts: 23,882
I have never heard the term 'receptacle' before. I thought everyone called them sockets, plugs, or outlets.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:58 AM.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: [email protected]

Send comments about this website to:

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: [email protected].

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: leo badges philodendron flowers 18th century cursive ugliest mustang gatorade and vodka nfl primetime music peek freans jingle hermaphrodite actress does pasta expire expert marksman self asphyxiation escort in calls cowboy showdown music kumon vs sylvan pronounce jainism applebee's bankruptcy snopes hot barefoot women remove gunshot residue cephalexin gonorrhea hitler oratory skills asshole prolapse goofy nicknames tamales wiki dirty dishwater blonde nicoderm generic bite tongue iud back pain portside sardines cspan3 schedule sofie carnivale plexiglass windbreak girls squealing lumenlab projector penny bernadette ps3 hdmi replacement 2000 cubic inches how far away can you see the statue of liberty examples of common sense best place to buy packing tape british equivalent of fbi malt vinegar on fries bob ross snl skit steel braided washing machine hoses should i stay up or sleep for 3 hours i can crack my nose the office why does michael hate toby making a new key brakes squeak when wet ebay reserve not met can you use drano in a dishwasher tinker toys for adults sitting on foot in chair how to take the back off a swiss army watch anchor babies pros and cons is java programming hard baldwin spinet piano weight papa was a rolling stone lyrics how to get a job on a freight ship red fire truck case law terminator 2 i need a vacation how to hide security camera outside how to print gold 3 snaps in z formation how to pronounce skopje pax tires for honda odyssey price how to fill a camelbak brushing your teeth with bleach why is quay pronounced key